Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Severe Thunderstorms Will Continue to Pound Parts of the Plains (FORECAST)

June 29,2016
More rounds of severe thunderstorms will impact parts of the Plains states this last week of June, producing damaging wind gusts, large hail and flash flooding. The chance of a few tornadoes also cannot be ruled out.
A pair of thunderstorm clusters produced damaging winds in western Oklahoma and far northwest Texas, then also in an over 400-mile long path from southwest South Dakota across western Nebraska, extreme northeast Colorado and western Kansas.
A radar recap of the twin thunderstorm clusters in the Plains states from the afternoon of June 28 into the early morning hours of June 29, 2016. Storm reports are shown as dots as they were reported to NOAA's Storm Prediction Center.

































A peak wind gust to 103 mph was measured at an automated weather station in Kings Canyon, south of Chadron, Nebraska, Tuesday evening.
For more storm reports, scroll down to our recap section below.
Playing a role in fueling the stormy weather this week are disturbances riding the jet stream southeastward between a western ridge of high pressure and eastern trough, or southward dip in the jet stream, setting up a "battleground" zone in the Plains where thunderstorms are more likely to occur. A stalling surface front accompanied by waves of low pressure will also help trigger the storms.
Radar, Watches, Warnings

Radar, Watches, and Warnings
Guide to Watches and Warnings
(MORE: View National Interactive Radar Map | Difference Between a Watch and a Warning)
Below is our latest forecast thinking on the timing and magnitude of the severe threats this week.

Severe Weather Forecast

Wednesday
  • Forecast: Scattered severe storms are possible primarily in parts of eastern Wyoming, southwest South Dakota, western Nebraska, northeast Colorado and northwest Kansas. 
  • Threats: Damaging winds, large hail, heavy rainfall and, possibly, a brief tornado or two.

Wednesday's Thunderstorm Forecast
Thursday
  • Forecast: Severe thunderstorms may impact portions of eastern Colorado, far northeast New Mexico, Kansas, northern Oklahoma, the northern Texas Panhandle and Missouri.
  • Threats: Damaging wind gusts and large hail. Locally heavy rain may cause flash flooding.
  • Cities: Wichita, Kansas | Springfield, Missouri

Thursday's Thunderstorm Forecast

Recap

Hail as large as 3.5 inches in diameter impacted Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas Tuesday evening, completely covering the ground in spots, including Coors Field in Denver.
Flooding was also a big problem across the Plains Tuesday evening, including at Coors Field in Denver, in addition to the wind and hail.
There were a few reports of weak tornadoes briefly touching down in eastern Colorado Monday evening, but no damage was reported from those.
Among the wind damage in the Plains states Tuesday included:
  • Ogallala, Nebraska: Windows at a tire shop blown out, numerous power lines downed
  • Near Hyannis, Nebraska: Roof damage, hay bales destroyed
  • Foss Reservoir, Oklahoma: Damage to a marina and boats

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PHOTOS: Plains, Midwest Mid-June 2016 Severe Weather and Flooding

Tropical North Pacific Ocean Nearing a Historic Tropical Cyclone Drought

Jon Erdman and Jonathan Belles
Published: June 29,2016

The dearth of named tropical cyclones in the tropical northern Pacific Ocean in 2016 is nearing record territory after one of the most hyperactive years in 2015.
(MORE: Hurricane Season Outlook | Hurricane Season Q & A | Debunking Hurricane Myths)
There hasn't been a single named storm of at least tropical storm intensity in the North Pacific Basin since Hurricane Pali became a January oddball just north of the equator and well southwest of Hawaii.
Most impressive is the lack of a single tropical storm, much less a typhoon (the term for a hurricane in the western North Pacific Basin), west of the international date line since mid-December 2015, in the world's typically busiest tropical cyclone corridor.

Current Satellite Image: Northwest Pacific Ocean
This is rapidly approaching the record longest stretch without at least a single tropical storm in the western North Pacific basin in 66 years of records, according to Colorado State University tropical scientist Dr. Phil Klotzbach.
Longest Northwest Pacific Stretches Without a Single Tropical Storm
(Source: Joint Typhoon Warning Center archive)
Start, End DatesConsecutive Days
Dec. 15, 1972 - June 30, 1973198
Dec. 22, 1997 - July 7, 1998198
Dec. 11, 1982 - June 24, 1983197
Dec. 17, 2015 - ? (through June 29, 2016)196
(Note: A correction has been made to the current streak, previously reported to have started on December 15, 2015.)
By late June 2015, there had already been eight tropical cyclones in the northwest Pacific basin, including three super typhoons of Category 5 equivalent intensity.
The eastern North Pacific basin has already set a record long wait for the first tropical storm in 2016.
June 21, 2009, was the previous record latest date of the eastern Pacific hurricane season's first named storm (Andres). Reliable records in the eastern Pacific basin date to 1971.
Tropical Depression One-E made a failed attempt to become the first of the season in early June. On average, the basin would've seen two named storms, one of which would reach hurricane strength, by late June.
A westward-moving tropical wave may finally snap this eastern Pacific record-long wait by this weekend, potentially becoming the season's first eastern Pacific tropical storm, "Agatha" well off the Mexican coast.

Current Satellite Image: Northeast Pacific Ocean
One year ago, there already had been a pair of Category 4 hurricanes – Andres and Blanca – in the eastern Pacific Basin, and a third named storm, Carlos, also became a hurricane by mid-June 2015.
Fueled in part by a record-tying El Niño, the eastern Pacific Basin saw a record nine hurricanes reach at least Category 3 intensity in 2015, as well as the strongest tropical cyclone on record in the Western Hemisphere, Hurricane Patricia.
The Central Pacific Basin (from 140 degrees west longitude until the international date line, including Hawaii) also set a record for activity in 2015, with 14 named storms and eight hurricanes, five of which reached at least Category 3 intensity. At one time, three Category 4 hurricanes were active at once in the central and eastern Pacific basins for the first time on record.
(MORE: 11 Things We Remember About the 2015 Hurricane Season)
Thanks in large part to the snoozing north Pacific basin, Klotzbach noted that tropical cyclone activity (measured by the accumulated cyclone energy or ACE index) in the northern hemisphere, despite the four named storms so far in the Atlantic basin, set a 45-year record low for the period from Jan. 16 to June 23, 2016.

How Unusual Is This 'Drought?'

This is the first time in records dating to 1950 that the entire North Pacific Basin has failed to generate a single tropical storm from Jan. 15 through June 21, according to Klotzbach (Note: "Agatha" formed on June 13, 1998, putting an end to the previous record streak).
Klotzbach also said this is only the second time in 66 years a period from January 16 - June 28 has not produced a single hurricane-strength tropical cyclone anywhere in the Northern Hemisphere, joining 1977 as the only other such time.
(MORE: You Can Help Improve the Historical Record of Hurricanes)
Despite that, these long dry spells have happened before.
"These types of tropical cyclone droughts are fairly common when moving away from strong El Niño seasons," said Klotzbach via Twitter.
(MORE: How Unusual Are Hawaii Hurricanes?)
As shown in the previous table, Klotzbach noted the four longest such droughts in the western Pacific Basin, including the current event, all immediately followed strong El Niños.
"Both the El Niño and the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) have tended to force sinking motion over the Northwest Pacific," said Klotzbach. The MJO is a large-scale, long-period wave of upward and downward motion that propagates around the tropical latitudes.
This sinking motion leads to drier, more stable air, fewer clouds, showers and anomalously high pressure at the surface over the western Pacific Ocean. All these factors work against the formation of tropical cyclones.
Typical tropical cyclone activity by month in the western Pacific basin from 1959-2010.
The western Pacific Basin is typically the most active area for tropical cyclones on Earth, where named storms, even typhoons, can form any month of the year.
As is the case in the eastern Pacific and Atlantic basins, western Pacific activity typically reaches a peak in August and September, so this drought won't last long.
However, with a potential developing La Niña (cooler-than-average equatorial Pacific water; opposite of El Niño) later this summer and fall, Klotzbach also pointed out tropical cyclone activity tends to be less in the Pacific during La Niña years. So perhaps the hard-hit Pacific basin may get a bit of a breather after a frenetic, record-smashing 2015.
Then again, it's important to keep in mind that it only takes one landfall to make any season "active" or "destructive."
(MORE: Are You #HurricaneStrong?)
Jonathan Erdman is a senior meteorologist at weather.com and has been an incurable weather geek since a tornado narrowly missed his childhood home in Wisconsin at age 7.

Coors Field Hailstorm Delays Rockies Game; 4 Rescued From Raging Water in Downtown Denver

Sean Breslin
Published: June 29,2016 




 
Powerful storms brought a unique hail-covered scene to Denver's Coors Field Tuesday night, but just miles down the road, the impacts were far more severe.
Firefighters rescued four people who were trapped by high water at downtown Denver's Cherry Creek Trail, according to CBS Denver. They were unharmed by the floodwaters.
The intense rainfall also created some flooding along Interstate 25, according to Denver Police Department video. The standing water was as deep as a foot in some areas, the department said.
(MORE: Wildfire Threatens 400 Structures in California)
Hail falls at Coors Field on Tuesday, June 28,2016. A Major League Baseball game between the Colorado Rockies and Toronto Blue Jays was delayed because of the storm.
(Bart Young/Getty Images)




































There were also a few reports of weak tornadoes briefly touching down in eastern Colorado Monday evening, but no damage was reported.
Elsewhere in the Plains, windows at an Ogallala, Nebraska, tire shop were blown out and numerous power lines were downed in the area. Near Hyannis, Nebraska, a roof was damaged and hay bales were destroyed by strong winds, and in Foss Reservoir, Oklahoma, a marina and boats were damaged during the storms.
The storms delayed a Major League Baseball game between the Colorado Rockies and Toronto Blue Jays at Coors Field on Tuesday evening. A hailstorm covered the field with a deep accumulation of hailstones, and heavy rain flooded at least one dugout and parts of a tunnel.
The game was delayed for two hours and 40 minutes, according to the Denver Post. Below are some images and videos from the park that were posted to social media during the storms.
Best grounds crew in baseball.

Coors Field under water. Clubhouse mgr Alan Bossart dealing with it.

That's not snow. Worst storm I've ever seen, and I'm a Denver native.

MORE: Flooding, Tornadoes in the Plains

Weather Underground National Forecast for Wednesday,June 29,2016

By: nationalsummary , 10:00PM,GMT on June 28,2016





 
Weather Underground Forecast for Wednesday,June 29,2016

Active weather will threaten the central Plains on Wednesday, while thunderstorms affect the Gulf Coast and the East Coast.

An area of low pressure will inch across the Plains. This system will produce strong to severe thunderstorms over parts of the northern and central Plains. Severe thunderstorms will be possible in southern South Dakota and Nebraska. These thunderstorms will be capable of producing large hail, dangerous straight line winds and isolated tornadoes. Heavy rain may lead to flash flooding in south central Nebraska and Kansas. Just to the north, a cold frontal boundary will swing across the northern Plains. This frontal system will initiate showers and thunderstorms from the upper Mississippi Valley to the upper Intermountain West.

Monsoonal moisture and daytime heating will trigger isolated showers and thunderstorms across the Four Corners and the Sierra Nevada. The bulk of these storms will fire up during the second half of the day. Above normal temperatures will persist in parts of the Southwest. Heat advisories will remain in effect for central Nevada and southern California through Wednesday evening.

Meanwhile, an area of low pressure will move northeastward across New England and southeast Canada. This system will usher rain and thunderstorms over a large part of the Northeast. A cold frontal boundary associated with this system will generate showers and thunderstorms across the Mid-Atlantic, the Southeast and the Gulf Coast. High pressure should keep most of the Midwest clear of precipitation on Wednesday.

This Date in Weather History for June 29,2016 from weatherforyou.com

Weather History
For Wednesday,June 29,2016
 
 
 
 
1931 - The temperature at Monticello FL hit 109 degrees to establish an all-time record for the state. (The Weather Channel)
1954 - Hurricane Alice dumped as much as 27 inches of rain on the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. The Rio Grande River at Laredo reached a level 12.6 feet above its previous highest mark, and the roadway of the U.S. 90 bridge was thirty feet below the high water. (David Ludlum)
1987 - Thunderstorms produced severe weather in the Ohio Valley and the Great Lakes Region, with reports of large hail and damaging winds most numerous in Ohio, Indiana and Michigan. Thunderstorms spawned four tornadoes in Michigan. A tornado near Clare MI was accompanied by softball size hail. In Colorado, an untimely winter-like storm blanketed Mount Evans with six inches of snow. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)
1988 - Alpena, MI, reported a record low of 39 degrees while Jackson, MS, equalled their record for the month of June with an afternoon high of 105 degrees. Thunderstorms in the central U.S. soaked Springfield MO with 3.62 inches of rain, a record for the date. (The National Weather Summary)
1989 - Thunderstorms produced severe weather in the Southern and Central High Plains Region. Thunderstorms in Colorado produced softball size hail at Kit Carson, while pea to marble size hail caused ten million dollars damage to crops in Philips County, CO. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

National Temperature and Rainfall Extremes for June 28,2016 from accuweather.com

As of 11:10PM,EDT/8:10PM,PDT




Daily U.S. Extremes

past 24 hours

  Extreme Location
High 119° Needles, CA
Low 31° Gardiner, MT
Precip 3.64" Gulfport, MS

Severe Weather Alerts - Dobbs Ferry, NY Special Weather Statement Special Weather Statement in effect until Wednesday, 12:00 AM EDT. Source: U.S. National Weather Service

NORTHERN WESTCHESTER:

...A STRONG THUNDERSTORM WILL AFFECT NORTHEASTERN BERGEN...
ROCKLAND...PUTNAM AND WESTCHESTER COUNTIES...

AT 1057 PM EDT...A STRONG THUNDERSTORM WAS LOCATED OVER NORWOOD...OR
OVER TAPPAN...MOVING NORTH AT 30 MPH.

WINDS IN EXCESS OF 30 MPH ARE POSSIBLE WITH THIS STORM.

LOCATIONS IMPACTED INCLUDE...
YONKERS...BERGENFIELD...PARAMUS...OSSINING...PEEKSKILL...
HAVERSTRAW...TARRYTOWN...MOUNT KISCO...DOBBS FERRY...NYACK...
BREWSTER...NANUET...NEW CITY...NORTH TARRYTOWN...MAHOPAC...TAPPAN...
ORADELL...BRONXVILLE...NORWOOD AND UPPER NYACK.

LAT...LON 4140 7358 4088 7384 4092 7408 4095 7407
4098 7407 4129 7404 4133 7398 4136 7396
TIME...MOT...LOC 0257Z 193DEG 25KT 4100 7394

===================

SOUTHERN WESTCHESTER:

...A STRONG THUNDERSTORM WILL AFFECT NORTHEASTERN BERGEN...
ROCKLAND...PUTNAM AND WESTCHESTER COUNTIES...

AT 1057 PM EDT...A STRONG THUNDERSTORM WAS LOCATED OVER NORWOOD...OR
OVER TAPPAN...MOVING NORTH AT 30 MPH.

WINDS IN EXCESS OF 30 MPH ARE POSSIBLE WITH THIS STORM.

LOCATIONS IMPACTED INCLUDE...
YONKERS...BERGENFIELD...PARAMUS...OSSINING...PEEKSKILL...
HAVERSTRAW...TARRYTOWN...MOUNT KISCO...DOBBS FERRY...NYACK...
BREWSTER...NANUET...NEW CITY...NORTH TARRYTOWN...MAHOPAC...TAPPAN...
ORADELL...BRONXVILLE...NORWOOD AND UPPER NYACK.

LAT...LON 4140 7358 4088 7384 4092 7408 4095 7407
4098 7407 4129 7404 4133 7398 4136 7396
TIME...MOT...LOC 0257Z 193DEG 25KT 4100 7394
Top Story

Storms to drench parts of northeastern US that have gone without rain since first week of June

June 28, 2016; 10:03 PM ET
Thunderstorms may provide the Northeast some relief for locations currently experiencing drought conditions.

New York City metro-area forecast for June 28-September 25,2016 from accuweather.com

Here's the 90-day weather forecast for the New York City metro-area for the period of the last 3 days of June,all of July,all of August,and the first 3.5 weeks of September (June 28-September 25),2016 from accuweather.com










Tonight,June 28-29: Remaining cloudy,rainy,stormy,warm and humid with a chance for a scattered evening shower or thunderstorm possible followed by some partial late-night clearing and a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.As of 1AM,EDT,June 29,it's 70 degrees with some thunder and drizzle,and 100% humidity,in White Plains,NY,and it's also 70 degrees and cloudy,with 86% humidity,in New York City.

Tomorrow,June 29: Turning warmer and less humid,with a blend of clouds and sun and a high temperature in the middle 80's,the very light,northwesterly winds and moderate-to-high humidity levels making it feel even hotter,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times.

Tomorrow night,June 29-30: Becoming mainly clear,but remaining seasonably warm for the beginning of summer and the end of June,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's, overnight.

Thursday,June 30: June of 2016 ends remaining very warm with a full day of blazing sunshine and a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's,the very light,sultry,westerly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much warmer,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times,once again.Becoming mainly clear, but remaining warm with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Friday,July 1: July of 2016 begins remaining very warm with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a chance for a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the middle80's.Remaining warm with patchy clouds and a low temperature dropping to the upper 60's to lower 70's,overnight.

Saturday,July 2: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining seasonably very warm for very early summer and the beginning of July,with a high temperature in the middle 80's,once again.Becoming clear,but cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 60's,overnight.

Sunday,July 3: Remaining mostly sunny and seasonably very warm for the beginning of July,with a high temperature,for the third straight day,in the middle 80's.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining seasonably warm for very early summer and very early July,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Monday,July 4: Independence Day (the Fourth of July),2016 will be turning partly sunny,but remaining very warm,with a high temperature,for the fourth straight day,in the middle 80's.Remaining partly cloudy,but remaining seasonably warm,with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees (perfect weather for fireworks displays going off this evening),overnight.

Tuesday,July 5: Becoming mostly sunny and quite warm,with a high temperature of 85-90 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining seasonably warm for very early July and early summer,with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,once again,overnight.

Wednesday,July 6: Turning hot,with increasing cloudiness and a high temperature in the upper 80's to lower 90's.Remaining partly cloudy,warm,and humid,with a low temperature dropping,for the third straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Thursday,July 7: Remaining hot with variable cloudiness and a chance for a rain shower and a high temperature of 90-95 degrees.Becoming clear,but remaining seasonably warm for early July and early summer,with a low temperature dropping,for the fourth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees, overnight.

Friday,July 8: Not as hot,but turning more humid,and unsettled with a chance for a shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's,the very light,sultry, northeasterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much hotter,like it's in the middle 90's,at times.Becoming mostly cloudy and cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,overnight.

Saturday,July 9: Remaining seasonably very warm and humid for early July and early summer,with variable cloudiness and a chance for a thunderstorm and a high temperature in the middle 80's,the very light,sultry,southeasterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much warmer,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times.Becoming clear,but remaining seasonably warm and muggy,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Sunday,July 10: Turning mostly cloudy,hot and sticky,with a high temperature of around 90 degrees, the light,sultry,southwesterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel quite hot,like it's 95-100 degrees,at times.Remaining cloudy,warm and soupy,with considerable cloudiness and a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 60's,once again,overnight.

Monday,July 11: Remaining cloudy,very warm and sticky,with considerable cloudiness and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees,the very light,sultry,steamy,easterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel even warmer,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times.Remaining cloudy,warm and muggy,but turning rainy and stormy,with evening thunderstorms,which could be strong to severe,followed by a spotty late-night thunderstorm,which could also be strong to severe,with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,July 12: Becoming rather cloudy,hot and steamy,with a high temperature of around 90 degrees,the light,sultry,steamy,soupy,southeasterly winds and very high humidity levels making it feel much hotter,making it feel brutally hot,like it's 100-105 degrees,at times.Becoming clear to partly cloudy,warm and muggy,with a low temperature dropping to 70-75 degrees,overnight.

Wednesday,July 13: Remaining hot,but turning mostly sunny,with a high temperature in the upper 80's to lower 90's.Becoming mainly clear and cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 60's,overnight.

Thursday,July 14: Turning cloudy,rainy,and cooler than recent days,but turning humid,once again, with a chance for a rain shower and a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's,the very light, sultry,westerly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much warmer,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times.Becoming clear,but remaining warm and humid with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Friday,July 15: Turning cooler and less humid than recent days,with a high temperature in the lower and middle 80's.Becoming cloudy,but remaining warm and dry,with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,once again,overnight.

Saturday,July 16: Remaining cloudy,rainy,stormy,very warm and muggy,with a chance for a couple of showers and a thunderstorm and a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's.Remaining cloudy, rainy,stormy,warm and muggy,with a chance for a couple of evening showers and a thunderstorm followed by a little late-night rain possible and a low temperature dropping,for the third straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,July 17: Remaining cloudy,rainy,stormy,seasonably warm and humid,with a little morning rain followed by a spotty afternoon rain shower and a high temperature in the lower and middle 80's, the very light,sultry,westerly winds and high humidity levels making it feel even warmer,like it's around 90 degrees,at times.Remaining cloudy,warm and muggy,but dry,with a low temperature dropping,for the fourth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Monday,July 18: Remaining cloudy,rainy,stormy,seasonably very warm and sticky,with more showers and thunderstorms possible and a high temperature in the middle 80's.Remaining cloudy,seasonably warm,but dry,with a low temperature dropping,for the fifth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees, overnight.

Tuesday,July 19: Remaining mostly cloudy,rainy,stormy,seasonably very warm and humid and unsettled,with a little morning rain followed by a spotty afternoon rain shower for the fourth straight day,and a high temperature in the lower and middle 80's.Becoming mainly clear,but remaining seasonably warm and humid for mid-to-late July and early summer,with a low temperature dropping, for the sixth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Wednesday,July 20: Remaining very warm,humid,and unsettled,with thickening cloudiness and a chance for a couple of afternoon showers and thunderstorms for the fifth straight day,and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees.Turning clear,once again,but remaining warm and humid with a low temperature dropping,for the seventh straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Thursday,July 21: Becoming mainly cloudy and quite warm,but also turning dry FOR A CHANGE,with a high temperature of 85-90 degrees,once again.Becoming clear to partly cloudy,but remaining seasonably warm for late July and early-to-mid summer,with a low temperature dropping, for the eighth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Friday,July 22: Becoming rather cloudy,once again,but also remaining dry,with a high temperature, for the fourth straight day,of 85-90 degrees.Remaining cloudy,but turning rainy and stormy,once again,with a chance for a couple of rain showers followed by a little late-night rain and flooding possible and a low temperature dropping,for the ninth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees, overnight.

Saturday,July 23: Remaining mostly cloudy,quite warm and sticky,but also dry,with a high temperature,for the fifth straight day,of 85-90 degrees.Remaining cloudy,muggy and warm,but dry,as this muggy,sticky,rainy,stormy,unsettled weather pattern continues to plague the area,with a low temperature dropping,for the tenth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,July 24: Remaining mostly cloudy,quite warm and steamy,with a high temperature of around 90 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining seasonably warm for very late July with a low temperature dropping,for the eleventh straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Monday,July 25: Remaining quite warm to hot,with periods of clouds and sunshine and a high temperature of around 90 degrees,once again.Becoming mainly clear,but remaining warm,with a low temperature dropping,for the twelfth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,July 26: Turning mostly sunny FOR A CHANGE,but remaining quite warm and toasty,with a high temperature of 85-90 degrees.Remaining mainly clear FOR A CHANGE,with a low temperature dropping,for the thirteenth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Wednesday,July 27: Remaining mostly sunny and quite warm,but turning more humid,and steamy, with a chance for an afternoon shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees,once again,the very light,sultry,easterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much hotter,making it feel quite hot,like it's 95-100 degrees,at times.Remaining partly cloudy,warm and muggy,with a low temperature dropping,for the fourteenth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees, overnight.

Thursday,July 28: Becoming mostly cloudy, not as warm,but remaining humid,with a chance for a shower or thunderstorm still possible and a high temperature in the middle 80's,the light,sultry, southeasterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much hotter,like it's in the middle 90's,at times.Remaining mostly cloudy,rainy,stormy,seasonably warm and humid,with a chance for a rain shower or thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Friday,July 29: Remaining seasonably very warm and humid for mid-summer,and the end of July,with a blend of clouds and sun and a chance for a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the lower and middle 80's,the light,sultry,southwesterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel even warmer,like it's in the upper 80's to lower 90's,at times.Becoming mainly clear,warm and humid,with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Saturday,July 30: Turning a bit warmer,but remaining humid and unsettled,with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a chance for a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees,the light,sultry,southwesterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much warmer,like it's in the middle 90's,at times.Remaining partly cloudy,warm,and humid,with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,once again,overnight.

Sunday,July 31: July of 2016 (one of the stormiest,rainiest,wettest,muggiest,steamiest Julys on record,if even half of this forecast for July 2016 holds up,if even half of the days forecasting showers and thunderstorms this month end up having showers and thunderstorms occurring in them),ends remaining seasonably very warm and sticky for mid-summer,with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a chance for a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the middle 80's,the light,sultry,southwesterly winds,which could gust past 25-mph,at times,in any thunderstorms, making it feel even warmer,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times.Remaining partly cloudy,rainy,stormy, warm and humid with more showers and/or thunderstorms leading to flooding,possible,and a low temperature dropping,for the third straight night,and the seventeenth night out of the last eighteen, down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Monday,August 1: August of 2016 begins remaining quite warm and steamy and soupy,with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a chance for a couple of showers and a thunderstorm,as August picks up where July left off,with a high temperature of 85-90 degrees,the steamy,soupy,southerly winds,which could gust up to 30-mph,at times,in any thunderstorms,making it feel very hot,like it's in the middle 90's,at times.Remaining mainly cloudy,rainy,stormy,warm and muggy,with a chance for a shower or thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping,for the fourth straight night,and the eighteenth night out of the last 19,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,August 2: Becoming rather cloudy,but remaining very warm,stormy,muggy and humid,with a chance for a couple of rain showers and a thunderstorm and a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's,the sultry,southerly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much warmer,like it's in the middle 90's,at times,once again.Remaining rather cloudy,rainy,stormy,warm and humid,with a chance for a shower or thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping,for the fifth straight night,and the nineteenth night out of the last 20,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Wednesday,August 3: Becoming partly sunny,drier and less humid than recent days,with a high temperature in the lower and middle 80's.Becoming mainly clear,but remaining seasonably warm for mid-summer and the beginning of August,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's, overnight.

Thursday,August 4: Turning mostly sunny,quite warm and dry FOR A CHANGE,with a high temperature of 85-90 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy and cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,overnight.

Friday,August 5: Becoming mostly cloudy,quite warm and sticky,once again,with spotty rain showers possible and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees,once again,the light,steamy,easterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel very hot,like it's in the lower and middle 90's,at times.Remaining mostly cloudy,warm and humid with  a chance for a shower or thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Saturday,August 6: Turning cooler than recent days,but also turning even more humid,with a mix of sun and clouds and a chance for a shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature of 80-85 degrees,the very light,almost calm,sultry,southwesterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much warmer,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining warm and humid with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 60's,overnight.

Sunday,August 7: Turning mostly sunny,hot and less humid,with a high temperature of around 90 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining rather warm for early August and mid-to-late summer and a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Monday,August 8: Remaining quite warm with periods of clouds and sun and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy,warm,and humid with a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,once again,overnight.

Tuesday,August 9: Becoming mostly cloudy,rainy,stormy,warm and muggy,with a chance for a couple of showers and a thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the lower and middle 80's, the light,sultry,southerly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much warmer,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining seasonably warm and humid for mid-summer and early August,with a scattered shower or thunderstorm leading to flooding,possible,and a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 60's,overnight.

Wednesday,August 10: Remaining seasonably very warm and humid for mid-to-late summer,with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a chance for a scattered shower or thunderstorm leading to flooding,and a high temperature in the lower and middle 80's,once again,the light,sultry,tropical, southeasterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much warmer,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times,once again.Remaining partly cloudy,warm and muggy,with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Thursday,August 11: Becoming mainly cloudy,but remaining rainy,stormy,seasonably warm and soupy with a chance for a couple of showers and a thunderstorm leading to flooding,and a high temperature of 80-85 degrees.Remaining cloudy,rainy,soggy,dank,dreary,and stormy,with considerable cloudiness and periods of rain leading to flooding,and a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,once again,overnight.

Friday,August 12:Remaining cloudy,rainy,stormy,seasonably warm and muggy for early-to-mid August,and mid-to-late summer,with considerable cloudiness and a chance for more showers and flooding possible and a high temperature of 80-85 degrees,once again.Remaining cloudy,rainy,warm and muggy,with considerable cloudiness and periods of rain and a low temperature dropping,for the third straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Saturday,August 13: Remaining cloudy,rainy,warm and humid with more showers leading to flooding in this suddenly storm-battered,water-logged region,and a high temperature,for the third straight day,of 80-85 degrees.Remaining cloudy,rainy,seasonably warm and humid,with more showers and flooding possible and a low temperature dropping,for the fourth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees, overnight.

Sunday,August 14: Remaining mostly cloudy,rainy,stormy,soggy and soupy,with a chance for a couple of showers and a thunderstorm leading to flooding and a high temperature,for the fourth straight day,of 80-85 degrees,the light,sultry,southeasterly winds and sky-high humidity levels;quite a common feature of the 2016 summer season for the water-logged NYC metro-area,making it feel much warmer,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times.Remaining cloudy,rainy,stormy,warm and soupy,with a chance for a couple showers and thunderstorms leading to flooding,and a low temperature dropping, for the fifth straight night,down to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Monday,August 15: Turning warmer,but also more humid,as it remains rainy,stormy and steamy,with periods of clouds and sunshine a chance for an ever present shower or thunderstorm possible,and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees,the very light,sultry,southwesterly winds and sky-high humidity levels making it feel brutally hot,like it's in the upper 90's to lower 100's,at times.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining seaso0nably warm and humid,with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 60's,overnight.

Tuesday,August 16: Becoming partly sunny,but remaining quite warm for mid-August and late summer,with a near record high temperature of 85-90 degrees,once again,the very light,sultry, northwesterly winds and moderate-to-high humidity levels making it feel even warmer,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times.Becoming mainly clear FOR A CHANGE,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Wednesday,August 17: Remaining partly sunny and quite warm to hot for mid-August,and late summer,with a near record high temperature,for the third straight day,of 85-90 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy,warm and humid with a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 60's,overnight.

Thursday,August 18:  Not as warm,with mostly cloudy skies and a chance for yet another scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature of 80-85 degrees.Remaining mostly cloudy,rainy,stormy, seasonably warm and muggy,with yet another thunderstorm leading to flooding possible and a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 60's,overnight.

Friday,August 19: Turning warmer,as it turns rather hot for late August and late summer,with partial sunshine and a record,or near record high temperature of 85-90 degrees,the very light,nearly calm, sultry,northwesterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel very hot,like it's in the middle 90's,at times.Becoming mainly clear FOR A CHANGE,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Saturday,August 20: Remaining quite warm to hot for late August and late summer,with ample sunshine FOR A CHANGE,and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees,once again.Remaining mainly clear and warm with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 60's,overnight.

Sunday,August 21: Remaining unseasonably hot for late August,with abundant,blazing sunshine and a near record high temperature of around 90 degrees.Remaining clear to partly cloudy and pleasant FOR A CHANGE,with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Monday,August 22: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining rather hot for very late August and late summer,with a record,or near record high temperature of 85-90 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy,warm,humid,rainy,and stormy,once again,with a chance for a shower or thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,once again,overnight.

Tuesday,August 23: Remaining rather hot for very late August and very late summer,in this otherwise cool,dank,dreary,stormy summer of 2016,with periods of clouds and sun and a chance for a thunderstorm and a record or near record high temperature of 85-90 degrees,once again.Becoming mainly clear and cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees, overnight.

Wednesday,August 24: Becoming mostly sunny and a bit cooler than recent days,with a high temperature in the middle 80's.Becoming mainly clear,but remaining pleasantly warm for very late August and very late summer,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's, overnight.

Thursday,August 25: Turning cooler than recent days,with periods of clouds and sun and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining partly cloudy and seasonably mild to warm for very late summer and very late August,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,once again,overnight.

Friday,August 26: Remaining seasonably warm for very late summer,with mostly sunny skies and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's,once again.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining seasonably warm with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,overnight.

Saturday,August 27: Remaining mostly sunny and seasonably warm for very late summer,with a high temperature of 80-85 degrees.Remaining mainly clear and seasonably warm for the end of August, with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Sunday,August 28: Remaining mostly sunny,seasonably warm and pleasant FOR A CHANGE,with a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining clear and seasonably warm,with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,overnight.

Monday,August 29: Remaining seasonably warm and pleasant for the end of August with ample sunshine and a high temperature of around 80 degrees.Remaining mainly clear and warm with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 60's,overnight.

Tuesday,August 30: Turning warmer than recent days,as it turns unseasonably very warm to hot,for the end of August,with partial sunshine and a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's.Remaining partly cloudy and warm with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's, overnight.

Wednesday,August 31: August of 2016 ends turning cloudy,rainy,and not as warm,with a chance for a rain shower and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining cloudy and rainy,but turning cooler than recent nights,with considerable cloudiness and a chance for a couple of showers and a thunderstorm leading to flooding,and a low temperature dropping to 55-60 degrees,overnight.

Thursday,September 1: September of 2016 begins remaining mainly cloudy,rainy,and seasonably warm for the end of summer,with a chance for a rain shower and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's,once again.Turning out clear and seasonably,pleasantly mild to warm for the end of summer,with a low temperature dropping to 55-60 degrees,once again,overnight.

Friday,September 2: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining seasonably warm for the beginning of September,and the end of summer,with a high temperature of around 80 degrees.Remaining clear through the evening followed by increasing cloudiness,and a low temperature dropping,for the third straight night,down to 55-60 degrees,overnight.

Saturday,September 3: Becoming mostly cloudy and rainy,once again,with a chance for a little more rain and flooding possible and a high temperature of 75-80 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining seasonably warm for the beginning of September,with a low temperature dropping,for the fourth straight night,down to 55-60 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,September 4: Remaining seasonably warm for very early September,with periods of clouds and sun and a high temperature of 75-80 degrees,once again.Remaining partly cloudy and seasonably warm for the unofficial end of summer,with a low temperature dropping,for the fifth straight night, down to 55-60 degrees,overnight.

Monday,September 5: Labor Day 2016 will be turning cloudy and rainy,but remaining seasonably warm for very early September,with a chance for a little rain and flooding possible and a high temperature,for the third straight day,of 75-80 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy and seasonably warm for the unofficial end of summer,with a low temperature dropping,for the sixth straight night,down to 55-60 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,September 6: Remaining seasonably warm for early September and the end of summer,with a mix of clouds and sunshine and a high temperature,for the fourth straight day,of 75-80 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy and seasonably warm for the end of summer,with a low temperature dropping,for the seventh straight night,down to 55-60 degrees,overnight.

Wednesday,September 7: Remaining mostly sunny and seasonably warm for early September and the end of summer,with a high temperature in the middle and upper 70's.Becoming clear and rather cool for early September and the end of summer,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 50's, overnight.

Thursday,September 8: Remaining seasonably warm for early September and the end of summer, with gorgeous ample sunshine and a high temperature of 75-80 degrees.Remaining clear and pleasantly mild to warm for early September,with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 50's,once again,overnight.

Friday,September 9: Turning a bit warmer than recent days,with ample sunshine,and a high temperature of around 80 degrees.Remaining clear,but turning a bit warmer than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Saturday,September 10: Remaining seasonably warm for the end of summer,with partial sunshine and a high temperature in the middle and upper 70's.Becoming mostly cloudy and rainy,with a chance for a rain shower and a low temperature dropping to 55-60 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,September 11: The 15-year anniversary of the 9/11-terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and the 4-year anniversary of the 9/11-terrorist attack on Benghazi will be remaining seasonably warm for the end of summer,with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a high temperature in the middle and upper 70's,once again.Turning clear to partly cloudy and rather cool and crisp for early September and the end of summer,with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 50's,overnight.

Monday,September 12: Remaining seasonably warm and pleasant with brilliant sunshine and a high temperature of 75-80 degrees.Remaining clear,but not as cool,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Tuesday,September 13:  Remaining seasonably warm for early-to-mid September and the end of summer,with sunny skies and a high temperature in the middle and upper 70's.Remaining mainly clear and seasonably warm,with a low temperature dropping to around 60 degrees,overnight.

Wednesday,September 14: Remaining mostly sunny,but turning warmer,as it turns rather warm for mid-September and the end of summer,with a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining clear and warm for mid-September,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Thursday,September 15: Remaining sunny and rather warm for mid-September and the end of summer,with a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's,once again.Remaining mainly clear and rather warm for mid-September,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,once again,overnight.

Friday,September 16: Becoming partly sunny and not as warm,with a high temperature of 75-80 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy and seasonably warm for mid-September,with a low temperature dropping to 55-60 degrees,overnight.

Saturday,September 17: Remaining very warm for mid-to-late September and the last days of summer,with a mix of clouds and sunshine and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining partly cloudy and seasonably mild to warm with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 50's,overnight.

Sunday,September 18: Turning mostly cloudy,rainy,raw,and cooler than recent days,with a chance for a little rain and a high temperature of 70-75 degrees.Remaining cloudy,rainy,warm and muggy,with a little rain and a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Monday,September 19: Becoming cloudy,rainy,raw,and cool with plenty of clouds and a chance for a couple of showers and a thunderstorm and a high temperature of 70-75 degrees,once again.Remaining cloudy,rainy,stormy,seasonably warm for late September and the end of summer,with a chance for a couple of scattered thunderstorms possible and a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 50's,overnight.

Tuesday,September 20: Turning a bit warmer than recent days,with partial sunshine,and a high temperature of 75-80 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining seasonably mild to warm for late September and the end of summer,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 50's,overnight.

Wednesday,September 21: The last (full) day of the 2016 summer season;one of the stormiest,rainiest, steamiest,muggiest and quite possibly even one of the coldest on record (at least in terms of the lack of 90+ degree days,in any event,though what this summer might lack in terms of heat and high temperatures,it made up for in terms of stickiness,mugginess and high humidity levels due to all the storminess),will be not as warm with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a high temperature of 70-75 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy and seasonably mild for late September,with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 50's,overnight.

Thursday,September 22: The first day of the 2016 autumn season will be turning cloudy,and rainy, but remaining seasonably warm for very late September with considerable cloudiness and a chance for a scattered rain shower possible and a high temperature of 70-75 degrees,once again.Turning rather chilly for very late September and the beginning of autumn,with patchy clouds and a low temperature dropping to the upper 40's to lower 50's,overnight.

Friday,September 23: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining seasonably warm for very late September and the beginning of autumn,with a high temperature,for the third straight day,of 70-75 degrees.Becoming mainly clear and not as cool,with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 50's,overnight.

Saturday,September 24: Remaining mostly sunny,but turning a bit warmer than recent days,with a high temperature in the middle and upper 70's.Remaining seasonably mild to warm with increasing cloudiness,and a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 50's,overnight.

Sunday,September 25: Remaining rather warm for very late September and the beginning of autumn, with low clouds and fog and a high temperature in the middle and upper 70's,once again.Becoming mostly cloudy and rather chilly for very late September and the beginning of autumn,with a low temperature dropping to around 50 degrees,the southwesterly winds,which could gust up to 30-mph,at times,making it feel even colder,like it's only around 40 degrees,at times,overnight.

Downpours to offer relief to drought-stricken parts of southern US into July

By , AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist
June 28,2016; 10:53AM,EDT
 
 
Rounds of drenching thunderstorms could bring drought relief to parts of the southern United States into July.
Portions of Tennessee, central Mississippi, northern Alabama, northern Georgia and the western part of the Carolinas have had a rainfall deficit of 4-8 inches since the start of the year.

A pocket of abnormally dry to severe drought conditions has persisted in parts of the interior South, while prevailing weather patterns have produced sufficient moisture along the Gulf and Atlantic coasts.
Cool air in the upper atmosphere and a swath of moisture will not only contribute to shower and thunderstorm activity but also enhance it in some cases.
This graphic shows an average of weather conditions, rather than forecast weather for every day of the week.
The middle part of the Mississippi Valley and areas along the southern Atlantic Seaboard will be most likely to experience frequent downpours.
Where the downpours overlap on a daily or near-daily basis, the risk of flooding will be greatest. The frequent storms could hinder travel and outdoor activities.
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While the bulk of the rain will avoid the driest spots in the South through Friday, there is the potential for downpours during the Independence Day weekend.
This weekend, the corridor of drenching showers and thunderstorms will likely shift farther to the north over the heart of the drought area in the Southern states.
Enough rain can fall in some communities to allow lawns to turn green, increase crop growth and stop the recession of streams and lakes.
During the warm months, patterns of both dryness and excess moisture are common due to the spotty nature of thunderstorms.
A lack of rainfall can be problematic in the summer when evaporation rates are high. Evaporation rates are on the order of one-third of an inch in the South during a sunny day in the early and middle part of the summer.
The downpours will reach into a portion of the significant drought area over the next couple of weeks.
Storms will also bring the threat of lightning. People spending time outdoors should keep an eye on the sky and move indoors at the first rumble of thunder or flash of lightning.

Storms to drench parts of northeastern US that have gone without rain since first week of June

By Chyna Glenn, AccuWeather.com Meteorologist
June 28,2016; 10:14AM,EDT
 
A lack of rain across the Northeast has allowed abnormally dry conditions to set up; however, drenching thunderstorms arriving this week may provide some relief.
As of last week, the United States Drought Monitor had 62 percent of the Northeast in some level of drought, impacting more than 22 million people.

However, a cold front will bring some showers and thunderstorms to the region through the middle of the week.
"The rounds of showers and thunderstorms occurring early this week in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic region, particularly along the I-95 corridor, will bring some relief from the recent rainfall deficit in June," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Carl Babinski said.
Many of the major cities in the Northeast, such as Boston, Hartford, Connecticut, and Syracuse, New York, have not received more than a trace of rain since the first week of the month.
The downpours associated with the shower and thunderstorm activity along the front will provide at least some relief for most of the drought-stricken areas of the Northeast.

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However, the spotty nature of afternoon storms may leave many without any measurable rainfall.
During the month of June, many locations only received one-third of the rain that typically falls. New York City and Philadelphia remain 1.56 and 1.28 inches below normal, respectively.
Buffalo, New York, and Boston fare even worse, with rainfall 2.03 and 2.18 inches below normal, respectively.
This particular event will not bring an end to the developing drought conditions in the Northeast.
"Most will get a cumulative total of an inch or less, but many will still be running about an inch behind what a typical June brings altogether," Babinski said.
This storm system will slowly lift out of the Northeast through the middle of the week, which will keep unsettled weather in the forecast until Wednesday.
High pressure will build back into the region on Wednesday night, and dry conditions will return through the end of the week.
 

Storms may disrupt July Fourth celebrations in central, eastern US

June 28,2016; 7:54AM,EDT
 
 
Thunderstorms may disrupt July Fourth activities in parts of the central and eastern United States.
While daily afternoon thunderstorms are not uncommon for early July, storms may pack a punch in parts of the Plains, Midwestern, Southeastern and mid-Atlantic states during the afternoon and evening on Independence Day.
Exactly which individual communities stand the best chance of getting hit hard by a big storm cannot be determined with reasonable certainty this far in advance.
However, the area of greatest concern for thunderstorms and locally severe weather conditions will likely stretch from Kansas and Oklahoma eastward to the Carolinas and Virginia on July 4, according to AccuWeather Storm Warning Meteorologist Alex Avalos.

"Some of the storms moving eastward along this swath are most likely to pack strong wind gusts, which can down trees, and heavy rainfall capable of causing localized flash flooding," Avalos said.
The thunderstorms in this swath could disrupt outdoor picnics and 5k runs and delay fireworks.
Most, but not all, of the storms will occur during the late afternoon and early evening hours when fireworks and celebrations will be at their peak.
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The storms are forecast to erupt along a west to east temperature and humidity boundary with cool, dry air to the north and hot, humid air to the south. Meanwhile, high above the ground, a fast river of air, known as the jet stream, will be nearby and could add the extra ingredients to produce severe weather.
Rather than a complete washout, the storms will likely take up only an hour or two of the day, with a few exceptions.
People spending time outdoors are encouraged to keep an eye on the sky and periodically check AccuWeather MinuteCast® and look for severe weather bulletins through the holiday weekend. At the first rumble of thunder, get off the lake or beach and move indoors to eliminate the chance of being struck by lightning.

Miami-Dade County joins list of South Florida communities enacting eco-friendly Styrofoam ban

By Kevin Byrne, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
June 28,2016; 7:40AM,EDT
 
 
The Miami-Dade County Commissioners recently passed an ordinance that would ban disposable Styrofoam products from county parks and beaches, joining a host of other South Florida communities striving to reduce one of the most common and harmful forms of litter.
Styrofoam, also known as polystyrene, can have numerous health and environmental impacts. The problems occur when Styrofoam, which is non-biodegradable, breaks into smaller pieces and gets scattered throughout public spaces and neighboring bodies of water.
The petroleum-based plastic is made up of a harmful monomer called styrene, which is used extensively in the manufacture of plastics, rubber and resins, according to the Earth Resource Foundation. Styrene has also been classified as a possible human carcinogen by the Environmental Protection Agency and the International Agency for Research on Cancer.
Lakeside litter (Photo/DWalker44/iStock/Thinkstock)
More than 20 environmental groups wrote a joint letter to the county commissioners outlining the necessities for the ban, which include the potential for more street flooding, the cost of removing the debris and wildlife fatalities.
"Most marine-based foam debris comes from land-based litter that degraded into small pieces, traveled down the storm drain, and ended up in the ocean," the letter reads. "Storm drains clogged by debris also contribute to flooding and can cause infrastructure damage that require costly maintenance and repairs."
Sea birds, fish and sea turtles can often mistake the floating white particles as food. Sea birds have been found dying of starvation with plastic particles in their stomachs.
Additionally, the ordinance cites Miami-Dade County's tourism-dependent economy and how the pollution can create an "unsightly nuisance."
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"[Styrofoam] is a huge problem," said Dave Doebler, founder of Volunteercleanup.org, one of the organizations to sign the letter. "In fact, every cleanup we do, we find a tremendous amount of Styrofoam. It's one of the top items that we find floating in the bay, trapped in the mangroves and along the shoreline."
Doebler said his website has coordinated about 400 cleanups in the last year, amounting to over 27,000 volunteer hours and 50 tons of plastic trash debris removed from the South Florida shorelines.
"Styrofoam is absolutely littered everywhere," Doebler said, adding that it's incredibly difficult to clean up.
There are roughly 10 variations of Styrofoam bans in South Florida, with Miami-Dade County's being the most recent, according to Doebler. The most stringent belongs to the city of Miami Beach, which is in the middle of enforcing a city wide ban scheduled to be fully implemented in September.
Pieces of broken up Styrofoam debris litters the ground along Biscayne Bay. (Photo/Dave Doebler)
The ban in Miami-Dade County will go into effect by July 2017. After that, any first-time offender who violates the ordinance will have to pay a $50 fine. Over the next year, officials plan to educate the public through public service announcements, social media and other public media.
As part of outreach efforts, the City of Miami has hosted cooler swaps where, rather than hand out violations, the city offers beachgoers a reusable cooler in exchange for a Styrofoam one.
While Doebler said it's a little early to say if existing restrictions have produced positive results, one of the benefits has been increased awareness throughout the public that plastic marine debris is a significant problem in South Florida.
There have already been some instances where coffee shops and restaurants have switched from Styrofoam to paper cups and are exploring biodegradable and compostable solutions for other materials, according to Doebler.
Styrofoam bans have been steadily increasing across the county and are already in effect in Minneapolis, Seattle, Washington, D.C. and San Francisco. The New York Supreme Court overturned New York City's ban in September 2015.
For those interested in volunteering to help fight ocean pollution, Doebler recommended taking part in International Coastal Cleanup day, scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 17.
More than 18 million pounds of trash were collected with the help of nearly 800,000 volunteers during the 2015 event.

Have questions, comments, or a story to share? Email Kevin Byrne at Kevin.Byrne@accuweather.com, follow him on Twitter at @Accu_Kevin. Follow us @breakingweather, or on Facebook
 

5 ways people stayed cool before air conditioning was invented

By Brian Lada, Meteorologist
June 28,2016; 7:22AM,EDT

As summer heat builds, more people will rely on air conditioning units to keep cool.
However, before air conditioning existed, people had to be creative when trying to stay comfortable in sweltering conditions.
Here are five different ways that people across the United States beat the heat in the 1800s and early 1900s.
Water fountains
Water fountains were very different in the 1800s and early 1900s than they are now, but they still provided an easy way to cool off in the summer.
Some fountains in big cities were built as large troughs so people could do more than just take a drink of water. On a hot summer day, they were an oasis where people could submerge their heads to stay cool.
(Photo/Library of Congress)
While fountains like these made it easier to find some relief from the heat, they also made it easier to contract an illness.
Not only were many different people using these fountains, but sometimes horses and other animals would use them as well, often rendering them unsanitary.
Ice blocks
With an eye on the summer heat, people would harvest and store ice blocks during the winter to be used in the warmer months.
Having ice available in the summer took some planning before refrigeration was available.
People would have to harvest ice from lakes that were frozen over during the winter months. The ice would then be stored in naturally cool buildings, called ice-houses, where they would sit before being distributed months later.
(Photo/Library of Congress)
Using ice to cool down on a hot summer day was efficient, but it was not always reliable due to the variability of winter weather.
If there was a mild winter, not as much ice would available to harvest, making it a rare commodity months later when the heat would build.
However, in frigid winters, more ice would be available to harvest, making the ice cheaper and more accessible during the summer.
High ceilings
Creative architecture was another way to prevent indoor conditions from becoming stifling and uncomfortable.
Because hot air rises, some buildings were built with high ceilings. The hot, rising air would then escape through windows near the ceiling to create a natural air flow.
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Front porches
Architects also incorporated front porches onto houses to give homeowners some relief from the heat.
People could then sit outside during the evening and early in the night when it was cooler.
The porch eventually turned into a place to socialize with friends and family while cooling off after a long hot day.
(Photo/Library of Congress)
Napping in the shade
Possibly the simplest way to beat the heat before air conditioning was to take a nap in a grassy area under a tree.
(Photo/Library of Congress)
Trees can be found almost everywhere, even in the heart of a New York City and provide plenty of shade for people nearby.
Taking a nap in the afternoon also meant not doing any strenuous work during the hottest part of the day, reducing the threat of dehydration, heat stroke and heat exhaustion.

Questions or comments? Email Brian Lada at Brian.Lada@accuweather.com and be sure to follow him on Twitter! Follow AccuWeather on Twitter or on Facebook.