Friday, March 27, 2015

World Weather Hot Spot for March 27-28,2015 from accuweather.com

New Bedford,Massachusetts,USA: Heavy rain and storms;received 0.91 inches of rain and some thunder and lightning sightings on Thursday (March 26,2015)

Today's Worst Weather History for March 27,2015 from accuweather.com

Lime Rock,Rhode Island: Rain

WeatherWhys for March 27,2015 from accuweather.com

A tornado outbreak brought March 2007 to an end across the central United States. The worst of the outbreak occurred from the afternoon of March 28 to the early morning hours of March 29 when dozens of tornadoes touched down from the Texas Panhandle to western Nebraska. A storm system that emerged from the Four Corners region was the culprit of the violent weather.

New York City metro-area forecast for March 27-May 10,2015 from accuweather.com

Here's the 45-day weather forecast for the New York City metro-area for the period of the last 5 days of March, all of April,and the first 10 days of May (March 27-May 10),2015 from accuweather.com









Today,March 27: Becoming cloudy and colder with morning cloudiness and a chance for a little rain followed by times of afternoon clouds and sun and a high temperature of around 50 degrees.As of 1PM,EDT,it's 42 degrees and cloudy,with 76% humidity,and a northwest wind at 14-mph,making it feel like it's 36 degrees,in White Plains,NY,and it's 44 degrees and cloudy,with 70% humidity,in New York City.

Tonight: Becoming mostly cloudy and colder than recent nights with a chance for a couple of late-night snow showers and a low temperature dropping to 30-35 degrees,the blustery,biting, northwesterly winds,which could gust past 15-mph,at times,making it feel much colder,like it's only in the upper teens to lower 20's above zero,at times,overnight.

Tomorrow,March 28: Remaining mostly cloudy and wintry,but turning even colder,as it turns unseasonably cold,once again,this time for the end of March,with a chance for a couple of snow showers and a high temperature only in the upper 30's to lower 40's,the blustery,biting,northwesterly winds,which could gust up to 30-mph,at times,making it feel much colder,like it's only in the upper 20's to lower 30's,at times.

Tomorrow night: Remaining mostly cloudy,raw,and wintry,but turning markedly colder than recent nights as it turns unseasonably very cold for the end of March,with a chance for an evening snow flurry then clearing and a near record low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 20's,the blustery,biting,bitter,northwesterly winds,which could still gust past 20-mph,at times,making it feel downright frigid for the end of March,like it's only 10-15 degrees above zero,at times,overnight.

Sunday,March 29: Palm Sunday 2015 will be turning mostly sunny and not as cold with a high temperature in the middle 40's.Becoming mostly cloudy and warmer than recent night with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 30's,the blustery,biting,southwesterly winds,which could gust past 15-mph,at times,making it feel much colder,like it's only 20-25 degrees,at times, overnight.

Monday,March 30: Turning much warmer than recent days with partial sunshine and a chance for a rain shower and a high temperature in the lower and middle 50's.Becoming mainly clear,but remaining seasonably cold for the end of March,with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 30's,the blustery,biting,northwesterly winds,which could gust up to 25-mph,at times,making it feel much colder,like it's only in the lower and middle 20's,at times,overnight.

Tuesday,March 31: March of 2015 goes out like a seasonably mild lamb as it remains dry with early sun followed by clouds and a high temperature of 50-55 degrees.Becoming mainly cloudy,rainy,raw, dank,and dreary,with periods of evening rain and a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 30's,once again,overnight.

Wednesday,April 1: April Fool's Day 2015 will be turning mostly sunny,but remaining seasonably mild for early spring with a high temperature of 50-55 degrees,once again.Remaining seasonably cold for early spring with patchy clouds and a low temperature dropping to 35-40 degrees,overnight.

Thursday,April 2: Turning cloudy,rainy,and warmer with a chance for rain and drizzle and a high temperature of 55-60 degrees.Remaining cloudy and rainy,but turning warmer than recent nights with occasional rain and a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 40's,overnight.

Friday,April 3: Good Friday 2015 will be remaining mild,but turning dry with times of clouds and sun and a high temperature in the middle and upper 50's.Turning cloudy and rainy,once again,but turning colder than recent nights with a spotty evening rain shower followed by a little late-night rain and a low temperature dropping to 35-40 degrees,the blustery,biting,southerly winds,which could gust up to 25-mph,at times,making it feel much colder,like it's only in the middle 20's,at times, overnight.

Saturday,April 4: Turning cloudy,rainy,and a bit cooler than recent days with a chance for rain and a high temperature in the lower and middle 50's.Turning much colder than recent nights,as it turns unseasonably cold,yet again,this time for very early April,with clearing and a low temperature dropping to the upper 20's to lower 30's,the blustery,biting,westerly winds,which could still gust up to 25-mph,at times,making it feel even colder,like it's only in the upper teens to lower 20's,at times, overnight.

Sunday,April 5: Easter Sunday 2015 will be turning cooler than recent days as it turns a bit cool or chilly for early spring and early April,despite plenty of gorgeous sunshine,with a high temperature only in the upper 40's to lower 50's.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining unseasonably cold for early April,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 20's to lower 30's,once again,overnight.

Monday,April 6: Turning cloudy,rainy,raw,dank,dreary,and unseasonably chilly YET AGAIN,with a chance for rain and a high temperature only in the middle 40's.Remaining mostly cloudy and rainy, but turning much warmer than recent nights with a low temperature holding in the upper 30's to lower 40's,overnight.

Tuesday,April 7: Remaining mostly cloudy and rainy,but turning markedly warmer than recent days as it turns unseasonably warm FOR A CHANGE,with a chance for a little rain and a high temperature in the middle and upper 60's,making this the warmest day of 2015 so far.Becoming mainly clear and mild with a low temperature dropping to the middle 40's,overnight.

Wednesday,April 8: Becoming cloudy,but remaining unseasonably warm for early April,with a high temperature of 65-70 degrees,making this the warmest day of 2015 so far.Not as mild as recent nights with clearing and a low temperature plunging to around 40 degrees,the blustery,biting,northwesterly winds,which could gust up to 20-mph,at times,making it feel much colder,like it's only in the upper 20's to lower 30's,at times,overnight.

Thursday,April 9: Turning mostly sunny and cooler than recent days with a high temperature in the upper 50's to lower 60's.Turning cloudy,rainy,even wintry late,with periods of a wintry mix of rain and sleet possible and a low temperature plunging to 30-35 degrees,overnight.

Friday,April 10: Remaining cloudy and rainy,but turning markedly colder than recent days as it turns unseasonably chilly YET AGAIN,with considerable cloudiness and a chance for a couple of rain showers and a high temperature only in the middle and upper 40's.Becoming partly cloudy and not as cold as recent nights with a low temperature dropping to the upper 30's to lower 40's,overnight.

Saturday,April 11: Not as cold with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a high temperature in the middle 50's.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining seasonably chilly for early April and early spring with a chance for a couple of rain showers and a low temperature dropping to 40-45 degrees, overnight.

Sunday,April 12: Turning cloudy,rainy,raw,dank,dreary,and unseasonably chilly,this time for early-to-mid April with a chance for rain and a high temperature only in the upper 40's to lower 50's.Remaining rather cloudy,but turning colder than recent nights with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 30's,overnight.

Monday,April 13: Remaining mostly cloudy and cool with a high temperature of 50-55 degrees.Becoming clear,but remaining rather cold for early-to-mid April with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 30's,once again,overnight.

Tuesday,April 14: Remaining rather chilly for mid-April with times of clouds and sun and a high temperature only in the lower and middle 50's.Remaining clear and unseasonably cold for mid-April with a near record low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 30's,overnight.

Wednesday,April 15: Tax Day 2015 will be remaining unseasonably cool to chilly with times of clouds and sun and a high temperature of just 50-55 degrees.Remaining mainly clear and unseasonably cold for mid-April,with a near record low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 30's,once again,overnight.

Thursday,April 16: Turning cloudy and rainy,but remaining unseasonably cool to chilly for mid-April with a touch of rain and a high temperature of just 50-55 degrees,once again.Remaining cloudy and rainy,but turning milder than recent nights with a chance for a little rain and a low temperature dropping to 35-40 degrees,overnight.

Friday,April 17: Remaining cloudy,rainy,raw,dank,dreary,and unseasonably chilly for mid-to-late April with a touch of rain and a high temperature only in the lower and middle 50's.Becoming clear, but remaining rather cold for mid-to-late April,with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 30's,overnight.

Saturday,April 18: Turning warmer than recent days with ample sunshine,and a high temperature of around 60 degrees.Not as cold as recent nights with increasing cloudiness and a low temperature dropping to the upper 30's to lower 40's,overnight.

Sunday,April 19: Remaining seasonably mild to warm for late April and early-to-mid spring with plenty of clouds and a high temperature of 60-65 degrees.Remaining cloudy,rainy,and mild with plenty of clouds and a chance for an evening rain shower followed by some late-night rain and a low temperature dropping to 40-45 degrees,the blustery,biting,northerly winds,which could gust past 15-mph,at times,making it feel even colder,like it's only 30-35 degrees,at times,overnight.

Monday,April 20: Remaining mostly cloudy and warm with a high temperature in the middle 60's.Not as mild with considerable cloudiness and a low temperature dropping to 35-40 degrees, overnight.

Tuesday,April 21: Turning much cooler/colder than recent days,as it turns unseasonably cool to chilly YET AGAIN,with clouds yielding to sun and a high temperature of just 50-55 degrees.Becoming clear and unseasonably cold for late April,with a near record low temperature dropping to the middle 30's,overnight.

Wednesday,April 22: Remaining rather cool for very late April despite brilliant sunshine,with a high temperature only in the lower and middle 50's.Becoming clear,but remaining unseasonably cold for early-to-mid spring with a low temperature dropping to 35-40 degrees,overnight.

Thursday,April 23: Remaining sunny,but turning much warmer than recent days as it turns seasonably mild to warm for very late April with a high temperature in the lower and middle 60's.Remaining clear,but turning much warmer than recent nights with a low temperature dropping to 45-50 degrees, overnight.

Friday,April 24: Becoming partly sunny and warm with a high temperature of 65-70 degrees.Becoming mostly cloudy,but remaining rather mild for very late April with a low temperature dropping to the middle 40's,the blustery,biting,northeasterly winds,which could gust up to 25-mph,at times,making it feel much colder,like it's only around 30 degrees,at times,overnight.

Saturday,April 25: Remaining seasonably warm for very late April with low clouds and a high temperature in the middle 60's.Remaining seasonably cool for early-to-mid spring with low clouds and a low temperature dropping to 40-45 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,April 26: Remaining cloudy,but turning much cooler/colder than recent days,as it turns unseasonably cool YET AGAIN,with a chance for a rain shower and a high temperature only in the middle 50's.Remaining cloudy and seasonably cool for early-to-mid spring with a low temperature dropping to 40-45 degrees,once again,overnight.

Monday,April 27: Remaining unseasonably raw,dank,and cool for the end of April,with low clouds and a high temperature of just 55-60 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy and rather cold for the end of April,with a low temperature dropping to around 40 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,April 28: Becoming mostly sunny and a bit milder/warmer than recent days with a high temperature of around 60 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy and milder than recent nights with a low temperature dropping to the middle 40's,overnight.

Wednesday,April 29: Becoming mostly cloudy and rainy,but remaining seasonably mild to warm for mid-spring and the end of April with a bit of rain and a high temperature in the upper 50's to lower 60's.Remaining mostly cloudy and rainy,but turning colder than recent nights with a touch of evening rain and a low temperature dropping to around 40 degrees,the blustery,biting,northwesterly winds, which could gust past 25-mph,at times,making it feel even colder,like it's only around 30 degrees,at times,overnight.

Thursday,April 30: April of 2015 ends turning unseasonably cool for mid-spring,with partial sunshine and a high temperature of just 55-60 degrees.Becoming clear and unseasonably cold with a near record low temperature dropping to 35-40 degrees,overnight.

Friday,May 1: May of 2015 begins remaining rather cool for mid-spring despite abundant sunshine, with a high temperature only around 60 degrees.Becoming mainly cloudy,rainy,and warmer than recent nights with a touch of rain and a low temperature dropping to 45-50 degrees,the blustery, biting,southwesterly winds,which could gust past 30-mph,at times,making it feel much colder,like it's only in the middle and upper 30's,at times,overnight.

Saturday,May 2: Becoming rather cloudy and rainy,but turning seasonably mild to warm for mid-spring with a chance for a couple of late-afternoon rain showers possible and a high temperature in the upper 50's to lower and middle 60's.Not as mild with patchy clouds and a near record low temperature dropping to the upper 30's to lower 40's,overnight.

Sunday,May 3: Remaining rather cool for mid-spring and the beginning of May,with variable cloudiness and a chance for a scattered rain shower and a high temperature only around 60 degrees.Becoming cloudy,rainy,raw,dank,and dreary,with periods of rain and a low temperature dropping to 40-45 degrees,the blustery,biting,northeasterly winds,which could gust past 15-mph,at times,making it feel much colder,like it's only in the upper 20's to lower 30's,at times,overnight.

Monday,May 4: Remaining rather cool for very early May and mid-spring with times of clouds and sun and a high temperature only in the upper 50's to lower 60's.Becoming mostly cloudy,raw,and chilly with a chance for a scattered rain shower possible and a near record low temperature dropping to the upper 30's to lower 40's,overnight.

Tuesday,May 5: Remaining cloudy,rainy,raw,dank,dreary,and unseasonably chilly for mid-spring with a spotty morning rain shower followed by a little afternoon rain and a high temperature only in the upper 50's to lower 60's,once again.Remaining cloudy,rainy,and unseasonably chilly for early May with a low temperature dropping to 40-45 degrees,overnight.

Wednesday,May 6: Remaining mostly cloudy,rainy,raw,dank,dreary,and unseasonably cool for mid-spring and early May with a bit of rain possible and a high temperature,for the third straight day,only in the upper 50's to lower 60's.Remaining cloudy,rainy,raw,dank,dreary,and chilly with periods of rain and a low temperature dropping to 40-45 degrees,once again,overnight.

Thursday,May 7: Remaining cloudy and rainy,but turning a bit milder/warmer than recent days with periods of rain and a high temperature of 60-65 degrees.Becoming mostly cloudy and milder than recent nights with a low temperature dropping to 45-50 degrees,overnight.

Friday,May 8: Remaining a bit cool for early May and mid-spring with partial sunshine and a high temperature of 60-65 degrees,once again.Remaining mostly cloudy,rainy,and seasonably mild for early May with a touch of rain and a low temperature dropping to 45-50 degrees,once again, overnight.

Saturday,May 9: Turning cloudy,rainy,raw,dank,and dreary,with periods of rain and a high temperature,for the third straight day,of 60-65 degrees.Remaining cloudy and rainy,but turning even milder,with evening rain showers followed by a spotty late-night rain shower and a low temperature dropping to 50-55 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,May 10: Mother's Day 2015 will be turning mostly cloudy and seasonably warm for mid-spring and early May with a high temperature of 65-70 degrees.Becoming mainly clear and colder with a low temperature dropping to the middle 40's,overnight.

Thursday, March 26, 2015

PHOTOS: Drought-Stricken California Community Close To Running Out of Water

Jon Erdman
Published: March 26,2015





 
These startling photos are more evidence of the severity of California's drought, now going into its fourth year.
Located about a three-hour drive east of San Francisco in the foothills of the southern Sierra Nevada, Lake McClure currently holds only 8 percent of its capacity as of late March, according to the Merced Irrigation District.
(MORE: Statewide Snowpack Reaches New Record Low)
More than 3,000 residents in the Sierra Nevada foothill community of Lake Don Pedro who rely on water from the 26-mile long lake could run out of water in the near future if the severe drought continues. Residents are under mandatory 50 percent water use restrictions.
This past week, California's snowpack dipped below a previous record low for late March set in 1977. This is more bad news, since California's reservoirs are typically replenished by spring snowmelt from the mountains
According to sfgate.com, a hiker found an old railroad line right-of-way while hiking along the lake bed in early February.

PHOTOS: Tornadoes Hit Oklahoma, Leave 'Massive Destruction'

March 26,2015



 
One person was killed and several injured after tornadoes hit Oklahoma on Wednesday, knocking out power, overturning vehicles and flattening structures, according to officials.
A tornado that raked through the Tulsa suburb of Sand Springs left "massive destruction," damaging as many as 60 homes in a mobile home park, a spokesman for the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office told NBC News.
(MORE: Oklahoma, Arkansas Tornadoes Kill 1; Damage Left Behind Again in Moore)
"Conditions are deplorable," the spokesman, Major Shannon Clark, said, according to Reuters. Clark also said rain, lighting and winds hampered rescue efforts.
At least nine people were hospitalized across the state during the severe weather outbreak, the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management confirmed to Associated Press. The Oklahoma State Emergency Operations Center was activated Wednesday night in response to the severe weather.
(MORE: Tornado Safety Tips)
Utilities companies said that more than 79,000 customers were without power across the state as of late Wednesday night. At least 10 Tulsa public schools were without power, prompting the city to cancel classes for Thursday, according to NBC News.
Another tornado was spotted in Moore, Oklahoma, where police said multiple buildings were damaged and numerous cars and trucks overturned. The town was hit by a tornado in 2013 that killed 24 and injured more than 300.
Tune in to The Weather Channel and check weather.com for updates.

Moore, Oklahoma City Tornado History

Jon Erdman
Published: March 26,2015



 

A Frequent Tornado Corridor

A small tornado appears to have touched down on the southwest side of the Oklahoma City metro area, tracking through the city of Moore, Oklahoma, on March 25, 2015.
(MORE: Oklahoma, Arkansas Tornadoes Latest News)
Thanks to considerable effort from the National Weather Service (NWS) office in Norman, Oklahoma, NOAA's Storm Prediction Center and historical tornado guru Tom Grazulis, this long history has been documented as best as records allow.
From 1890-2013, at least 156 tornadoes were documented in the Oklahoma City metro area, an average of just over one each year. Since weak tornadoes were not always documented prior to 1950, this number is likely well underestimated, according to NWS.
Some other interesting facts from the NWS/SPC/Grazulis study:
  • 13 violent tornadoes (F/EF4 or stronger), including May 19, 2013 in Shawnee and May 20, 2013 in Moore.
  • May is the peak month, followed by April and June. About two-thirds of all metro tornadoes have occurred in those months.
  • Mid-afternoon through early evening is the most frequent time of day.
  • Through 2013, the OKC metro experienced two or more tornadoes on the same day 26 separate times.
  • Only three periods since 1950 with over a two-year lapse between tornadoes.  
Let's recount recent Oklahoma City metro tornadoes, beginning with one of the largest tornadoes on record.

May 31, 2013

Storm-relative velocity loop from the NWS-Norman, Oklahoma Doppler radar from 6:00 to 6:19 p.m. CDT of the El Reno, Oklahoma tornado on May 31, 2013. Interstate 40 is depicted by the yellow line roughly west-to-east near the center of the images.
Of the 11 tornadoes in Oklahoma, Cleveland or Canadian Counties that day, an exceptionally wide, intense, multi-vortex tornado near El Reno, Oklahoma, was the headliner of the outbreak.
The El Reno tornado claimed eight lives, all in vehicles, including renowned storm chaser/researcher Tim Samaras, his son Paul, and his chase partner Carl Young. The circulation also overtook and rolled The Weather Channel's Tornado Hunt vehicle, requiring one chase team member to be hospitalized.
The University of Oklahoma's RaXPol mobile radar sampled winds of at least 295 mph in the El Reno tornado. The Doppler on Wheels mobile radar from the Center for Severe Weather Research also measured winds over 200 mph. Initially rated an EF5 tornado based on these measurements, NOAA then downgraded the rating to EF3 in late August 2013, since the Enhanced-Fujita is a tornado damage scale, and no damage higher than EF3 was found.
The width of the tornado was given a conservative estimate of 2.6 miles, a new official record for the widest U.S. tornado, beating the previous record of 2.5 miles near Hallam, Nebraska, on May 22, 2004.
(RECAP: One of the Widest Tornadoes)
There were several vortices wrapping around the massive circulation of the El Reno tornado.
"Think of the average size of an Oklahoma tornado you'd see on a typical afternoon. Three or four of those things moving along the ground at a speed of 170 to 180 miles per hour, crossing each other with all kinds of violent motions going on," said Rick Smith, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Norman, Oklahoma. "So this is going to be studied for a long time."
Smith later noted that a few of these vortices may have been moving along the ground at a jaw-dropping forward speed of 185 miles per hour, even as the parent tornado lumbered along at a forward speed of about 24 miles per hour.
Smith noted that the extreme winds associated with the subvortices affected a relatively small area compared to the tornado as a whole. None of the subvortices hit any structures, which is why mobile radar data from the University of Oklahoma were needed to assess the true strength of tornado; based on damage alone, survey crews could only find visual evidence of EF3 winds.
(MORE: El Reno Tornado Timeline)
Amazingly, the Doppler on Wheels also detected an EF2 tornado rotating anticyclonically (winds rotating clockwise, instead of counterclockwise, as in most northern hemisphere tornadoes) southeast of the main El Reno tornado.
The tornadic supercells then rolled into the Oklahoma City metro area during Friday evening rush. In a word, it was "chaos." Passengers at Will Rogers World Airport were evacuated to underground tunnels. Freeways, including Interstate 35, were jammed with traffic.
(MORE: Oklahoma City May 31 Tornado Timeline)
An EF1 tornado was confirmed to have tracked 10.4 miles across the southwest Oklahoma City metro, including Will Rogers World Airport. Another EF0 tornado touched down on the north side of Moore.
If that wasn't enough, training thunderstorms moving across the metro area triggered deadly flash flooding that evening. In Oklahoma County, 13 people lost their lives in the flash flood. At least 23 high water rescues were conducted.
NEXT > Just 11 days earlier, an EF5 in Moore

May 19-20, 2013

Destructive tornadoes on back-to-back days raked through parts of central Oklahoma in mid-late May 2013.
On the evening of May 19, an EF4 tornado tracked from Lake Thunderbird on the east side of the city of Norman to near Shawnee, Oklahoma. Another EF3 tornado tracked from far northeast Oklahoma County into Logan and Lincoln Counties, including the towns of Carney, and Luther.  Before spawning that tornado, an EF1 tornado was spawned in the northern suburb of Edmond.
As residents were sifting through the debris from these tornadoes the following day, a lone supercell thunderstorm spawned a massive tornado up to 1.3 miles wide through Newcastle and Moore, Oklahoma, claiming 24 lives and affecting an estimated 1,200 homes. Two schools were levelled and the Moore Medical Center was heavily damaged.
(MORE: A Rare EF5 | As it Happened)
Preliminary damage estimates from this tornado exceed $2 billion, placing this tornado among the most costly in U.S. history.
NEXT > This was roughly three years after many of the same areas were hit in the state's second largest outbreak.

May 10, 2010

Tornado swath map on May 10, 2010. (Credit: National Weather Service - Norman, Okla.)
This particular date doesn't necessarily have the notorious nature of other events, however, this was the second largest outbreak in recorded state history.
AP Photo
A total of 56 tornadoes were observed in Oklahoma that afternoon.  Two of these tornadoes were rated EF4, and another four were rated EF3 on the Enhanced Fujita scale.  According to NWS-Norman, over a roughly two-and-a-half hour period, there was at least one tornado taking place each minute somewhere in the Sooner State.
One of those EF4 tornadoes carved through the north side of Norman and southeast side of Moore, along its 24-mile long path.  Two were killed and 49 injured from this tornado.
Amazingly, two other tornadoes also touched down in Moore that day, both rated EF1.  One of those took a four-mile path in the east side of the city of Moore.
NEXT > A mind-boggling coincidence almost ten years prior to the 2013 event.

May 8-9, 2003:  Consecutive Days/Strong Tornadoes

Approximate tornado tracks through Moore, Okla. on May 20, 2013 (red), May 8, 2003 (green) and May 3, 1999 (blue).
This was the first time in recorded history the OKC metro area was hit by F/EF3+ or stronger tornadoes on consecutive days.
There were only three tornadoes in central Oklahoma on May 8, 2003. Unfortunately, one of those was an F4 tornado that tracked over some of the same areas heavily damaged by the more infamous May 3, 1999 tornado in Moore and the south Oklahoma City metro area.
A flipped church van sits in the backyard of a home in Moore, Okla. on May 9, 2003. (Photo: NWS-Norman)
(NWS-Norman)
In another testament to the collaboration between NWS forecasters, local media, and the emergency management community, no fatalities occurred with this tornado.
What was also exceptional about this event was the following day.
Three more tornadoes were spawned in the Oklahoma City metro area the evening of May 9, 2003, including an F3 tornado tracking from south of Edmond to near Luther, Oklahoma, a path of just under 18 miles.
May 19-20, 2013 became the second time in recorded history to witness F/EF3+ tornadoes on consecutive days, almost exactly ten years after it was first done.
In fact, both the 2013 and 2003 events featured two tornadoes tracking from roughly the Edmond area to near Luther, as well as a Moore/Norman track.
NEXT > The infamous May 3, 1999 outbreak.

May 3, 1999

Oklahoma's largest and, perhaps, most iconic and notorious tornado outbreak spawned a total of 61 tornadoes across the state.
The most destructive of these was the infamous F5 Bridge Creek/Moore/Oklahoma City tornado, which alone was responsible for $1 billion in damage and 36 fatalities alone. It was the first F5 rated tornado in the metro's history. May 20, 2013 was the second "five-rated" metro area tornado.
(MORE: One of Dr. Forbes' Worst Outbreaks)
A mobile research radar, the "Doppler-on-Wheels," measured a wind speed of 301 mph at a height of 105 feet above the ground in this massive tornado.
As you can see from the map on a previous page, the May 3, 1999, tornado tracked through some of the same areas as 2013, 2010, and 2003, including the corridor from just north of Newcastle to Moore.
On this day, another tornado also touched down near Shawnee, Okla., rated F2.  Sound familiar?
NEXT > Finally, a metro tornado that was absolutely crucial for severe forecast research.

March 20 and 25, 1948

It was a pair of Oklahoma City metro tornadoes that helped launch the very severe weather forecasts that we depend on today.
On March 20, 1948, an F3 tornado demolished 52 aircraft at Tinker Air Force Base on Oklahoma City's southeast side. At the time, it was the costliest tornado in state history.
The following day, the Tinker Base Weather Station was directed to investigate whether this type of event could be predicted. Prior to this time, public tornado alerts were banned from the late 1880s until 1938, for fear of causing "unneeded panic."
In charge of this effort were Major Ernest Fawbush and Captain Robert Miller.
Analyzing several other recent outbreaks, Fawbush and Miller noticed large-scale weather patterns common to each event.
On the morning of March 25, 1948, Fawbush and Miller found a similar weather pattern setting up that day, concluding a threat of tornadoes existed again in central Oklahoma that afternoon.
After consulting Commanding General of the Oklahoma City Air Material Area, Fred Borum, a forecast for "heavy thunderstorms between 5 and 6 p.m." was issued for the base.
As it turned out, thunderstorms did form west of the Oklahoma City metro area in mid-afternoon.  The forecast time of arrival: around 6 p.m. General Borum then asked, "Are you going to issue a tornado forecast?"
After some understandable queasiness, Fawbush and Miller issued what was probably the equivalent of today's "tornado watch" for the base. Preparations raced to completion, including moving base personnel and moving aircraft to hangars.
Just after 6 p.m., a tornado had, in fact, touched down at Tinker AFB. The first operational tornado forecast was a rousing success.
While we still cannot forecast today exactly where, or sometimes if, tornadoes will track on any given day, the Fawbush and Miller forecast proved general conditions favorable for severe weather could be forecast ahead of time.
The fact we can pinpoint dangerous severe weather potential even a couple of days out today can be traced back to this courageous forecast in 1948 and the subsequent development of forecast techniques and Doppler radar by talented research and operational meteorologists.

MORE:  U.S. Cities Tornadoes By Month Since 1950

Possible New Continental Heat Record for Antarctica

By: Christopher C. Burt , 5:27AM,GMT on March 26,2015




Possible New Continental Heat Record for Antarctica

On March 24th Base Esperanza (under Argentinean administration) located near the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula reported a temperature of 17.5°C (63.5°F). Although this is the warmest temperature ever measured since weather stations became established on the southern continent, it is complicated by what the very definition of ‘Antarctica’ is. Here’s a brief review.



Argentina’s Esperanza Base on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. It is located near 63°S latitude. Image from Wikipedia.





METAR tables for Base Esperanza (top) and Base Marambio (bottom) for the days of March 23-24. The 17.5°C (63.5°F) at Esperanza on March 24th and 17.4°C (63.3°F) at Marambio on March 23rd exceed any temperatures yet measured on or very close to the Antarctic landmass. Tables from OGIMET.

The 17.5°C (63.5°F) temperature at Esperanza occurred just one day following a reading of 17.4°C (63.3°F) measured at Base Marambio (also under Argentinean administration) on March 23rd. Marambio is located about 60 miles (100 km) southeast of Esperanza. Both figures surpass any temperature yet measured at either site. Esperanza’s previous record high of 17.0°C (62.6°F) was recorded in October 1976 according to weather records researcher Maximiliano Herrera. More importantly, the temperature at Esperanza exceeds any figure yet observed on the Antarctic landmass or Peninsula. According to the WMO, the all-time warmest temperature yet observed in Antarctica was 15.0°C (59.0°F) at Vanda Station on January 5, 1974. Vanda Station is located near 77°S latitude but was occupied for only brief periods, mostly during the Austral summers, between 1967-1995. It now has an automated weather station and is occasionally visited by researchers. Base Esperanza’s weather records began in 1945 according to data published in The World Survey of Climatology: Vol. 14, The Polar Regions. On page p. 353 there is a table of climate data for Esperanza based upon the POR of 1945-1960. I am not sure if the POR has been continuous since 1960 up to the present. Base Marambio was founded in 1969 and is a relatively large facility with at least 55 year-round personnel, a total that swells to 200 during the summer.



Map of Antarctica showing the locations of the various sites referred to in this blog. A table of what the highest observed temperature on record for each of the four sites discussed is below the map.

Despite the fact that the temperature record from Vanda appears on the list of world weather extremes maintained by the WMO, the WMO has not yet investigated all-time weather records for Antarctica, so the Vanda reading and the recent observations at Esperanza and Marambio remain ‘unofficial’ (so far as continental world-record-temperature extremes are concerned).

That being said, and given the recent extraordinary temperatures observed at Esperanza and Marambio, there is a chance that the WMO may wish to launch such (an investigation of Antarctica’s warmest measured temperature).

Should this happen the first issue will be the definition of the region of ‘Antarctica’ for the purpose of weather records relating to the continent. There could be perhaps three (or even four) possible scenarios.

1) The narrowest interpretation might be to include only sites that are south of the Antarctic Circle (near 66°S latitude). In that case, Esperanza would not be part of the record set and the Vanda figure might stand.

2) A more broadly accepted definition would be that adopted by the Antarctic Treaty System in 1961 which defined ‘Antarctica’ to include all land and ice shelves located south of the 60°S latitude. Should this interpretation be used, then the South Orkney Islands, which lie about 500 kilometers northeast of the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, would fall inside the investigation area. That would mean that the British outpost, Signy Research Station (latitude near 60° 43’S), on Signy Island would have measured the warmest temperature on record in Antarctica with a 19.8°C (67.6°F) on January 30, 1982 according to research by Maximiliano Herrera.

3) The third possible definition would be to include only the landmass of Antarctica (although the Antarctica Peninsula is actually composed of a series of islands connected to one another by ice sheets). In that case the recent 17.5°C at Base Esperanza would most likely stand as the warmest temperature yet measured on the continent.

4) Maximiliano adds yet a possible fourth consideration: areas associated with the Antarctic geological shelf. See his note on his Wiki page of continental records here. He adds the following footnote: “If we consider the geological case, Amsterdam Island, (located at 37° 49'S and 77° 33'E), which belongs to the French dependence of the French Southern and Antarctic Lands and associated with Africa, lies on the Antarctic plate and has a highest temperature of 26.4°C (79.4°F) on 30 January 2005”.

More About the Unusual Warmth at Bases Esperanza and Marambio

One surprising aspect of the temperatures measured recently at Esperanza and Marambio are that they occurred in autumn, nearly three months past the usual warmest time of the year in the Antarctic Peninsula. According to NOAA December is typically the warmest month in Esperanza, with an average high temperature of 37.8°F (3.2°C). The March average high temperature is 31.3°F (-0.4°C), so temperatures on Tuesday, March 25th, were more than 30°F (17°C) above average. However, looking at the statistics in the World Survey of Climatology (referred to earlier) it is interesting to note that the warmest temperature observed at Esperanza during the period of 1945-1960 was a 14.6°C reading during an October and the 2nd warmest was 14.2°C during an April (also tied in January). So we can see that record high temperatures for Esperanza are not confined to just the summer months.



Departure of temperature from average for Tuesday, March, 24, 2015, over Antarctica. Temperatures were more than 30°F (17°C) above average. Image credit: University of Main Climate Reanalyzer.

A strong high pressure ridge and a Foehn wind led to the record temperatures as Jeff Masters explains here:

This week's record temperatures were made possible by an unusually extreme jet stream contortion that brought a strong ridge of high pressure over the Antarctic Peninsula, allowing warm air from South America to push southwards over Antarctica. At the surface, west to east blowing winds over the Antarctic Peninsula rose up over the 1,000-foot high mountains just to the west of Esperanza Base, then descended and warmed via adiabatic compression into a warm foehn wind that reached 44 mph (71 km/hr) at 09 UTC on March 24th, near when the maximum temperature was recorded. A similar event also affected Marambio on the 23rd.



Jet stream image for Tuesday, March, 24, 2015, over Antarctica. An unusually extreme contortion of the jet stream allowed a ridge of high pressure to extend far to the south over the Antarctic Peninsula, bringing record-warm air from South America. Image credit: : University of Main Climate Reanalyzer.


KUDOS: Thanks to Maximiliano Herrera for bringing this to our attention and researching the temperature records for Antarctica.

Christopher C. Burt
Weather Historian 




7. BaltimoreBrian
2:54 AM GMT on March 27, 2015
I disagree about assigning distant island groups to continents. Tristian de Cunha is not a part of Africa. Hawaii is not part of North America. South Georgia is not a part of Antarctica or South America. We'll agree to disagree.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 9503
6. panamint
2:29 AM GMT on March 27, 2015
It is just convention that we separate the world into continents (generally being the continental land masses, although Europe is split off from Eurasia for whatever reason), but there are only seven of them. Any remaining islands are then placed into one of these continents for grouping, statistical, political and other purposes, but it's an ad hoc thing done for various reasons.

The South Orkneys are very roughly 400 miles from the Antarctic mainland, but maybe 1200 miles from South America, so common sense says they're grouped as part of Antarctica.

When discussing continental temperature records, I am quite comfortable with Signy Island taking the Antarctic record with a footnote that Base Esperanza has the Antarctic mainland record.

PS Good to have you back Chris!
Member Since: March 27, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 6
5. BaltimoreBrian
1:26 AM GMT on March 27, 2015
I don't have a big problem with including the South Shetland islands in Antarctica, although I'd also like to see a separate record for the 'mainland' of Antarctica in that case. The South Orkney Islands don't have to be included with a continent but could be just their own group.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 9503
4. panamint
1:10 AM GMT on March 27, 2015
Any good look at an atlas will illustrate that Signy Island and the rest of the South Orkney Islands are an extension north-eastwards of the spine of the Antarctic Peninsula, so geologically they are a part of Antarctica (and also politically through the Antarctic Treaty as they lie south of 60S). Any land northwards of 60S obviously fails the political test.

If the South Orkneys are to be excluded from Antarctica, then logically they must be included in South America, so now we have a new reliable absolute minimum temperature for South America of -40.1C, which also comes from Signy Island.

Lots of luck in getting that record past the "bunch of inepts" (Max's description) at WMO.
Member Since: March 27, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 6
3. BaltimoreBrian
11:55 PM GMT on March 26, 2015
My opinion is that Antarctica consists of the continent and immediately adjacent islands. Esperanza and Marimbio are part of Antarctica and the South Orkney Islands are not. I'd include the Palmer Islands in Antarctica and not the South Shetland Islands. Yes, I'm being arbitrary :) Click on map below to expand.

Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 9503
2. FormosanBlackBear
2:06 PM GMT on March 26, 2015
God to have you back! Hope you enjoy the vacation!
Member Since: January 19, 2015 Posts: 0 Comments: 17
1. maxcrc
10:27 AM GMT on March 26, 2015
Inded, Esperanza and Marambio records are OFFICIAL and confirmed , not unofficial.
Several other stations have recorded OFFICIAL temperatures above 15C:
Larsen 16.1C
Base Orcadas 15.2C
Base San Martin 15.0C
few stations in the King George island with official records as high as 16.7C.

Not to mention the previous OFFICIAL records of Esperanza (17.0C) and Marambio (16.5C).

It is not up to the WMO, whose workers are a bunch of inepts without even the minimal knowledge of the very basic of climatology to decide what is official or not
In fact, almost all their Continental records are completely wrong, they are so ridiculous and physically impossible that even a kindergarten 3 years old kid would laugh like crazy at those absurde data.
So it's s completely IRRELEVANT what those lazy bureaucrats do or don't do.
Why don't you tell to the New Zealand MetService that their OFFICIAL and 100% correct national record of 42.4C set in 1973 is unofficial because the WMO prefers a completely wrong record 42.2C set in 1912 in the Philippines without a Stevenson Screen as the Oceania highest temperature ? A wrong temperature, a lower temperature in any case in another continent. Fantastic ! They would probably suggest you a good shrink or to go back to the primary school and study some geography and science.
These readings above are also 100% OFFICIAL according to the National Institutes of Meteorology and Institutions which manage them.
There is no way we can spit on their work only to favor an extremely corrupt and incompetent institution.

The issue whether to include the South Orkney Islands in Antarctica is the only debatable point here.

Member Since: February 9, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 201


Deadly Tornado Pummels Mobile Home Park in Oklahoma

By: Bob Henson , 4:03PM,GMT on March 26,2015





Two Oklahoma suburbs took the brunt of damage from a rapid-fire severe weather outbreak that developed Wednesday afternoon. At least one person was killed and another critically injured when a tornado and/or accompanying downdraft winds moved across a manufactured home park in Sand Springs, just west of Tulsa. A number of mobile homes were reportedly destroyed in the high winds. Just south of Oklahoma City, the long-suffering town of Moore--struck by catastrophic F5/EF5 tornadoes in 1999 and 2013 and a deadly tornado that produced F3 damage in Moore in 2003--experienced yet another twister, though fortunately a much weaker one than its predecessors. Overall, the severe weather on Wednesday covered a swath from central Oklahoma to southeast Missouri, producing a preliminary count of 8 tornadoes and more than 110 reports of severe hail, some as large as baseballs.



Figure 1. First responders work to free a man from a pile of rubble after a round of severe weather hit a trailer park near 145th West Avenue and West 17th Street in Sand Springs, Okla., Wednesday, March 25, 2015. (AP Photo/Tulsa World, Matt Barnard)

Wednesday’s damage in Sand Springs is a painful reminder of our lack of national policy on mobile home safety in tornadoes. Winds of no more than 110 mph (a borderline EF1/EF2 on the Enhanced Fujita Damage Scale) can destroy the roof and walls of a typical manufactured home, or cause it to roll over. Although just 5% of Americans live in mobile homes, anywhere from 25% to 50% of tornado-related deaths in a typical year occur in such homes, including 17 of 47 U.S. deaths in 2014, 17 of 55 deaths in 2013, and 48 of 68 deaths in 2012, according to data from NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center. Thousands of mobile home residents live on acreages with no ready source of safe shelter, but even those who live in mobile home parks often lack an underground refuge. Although the state of Minnesota and some localities mandate shelters, safe rooms, and/or an evacuation plan when mobile home parks reach a certain size, there is no such national requirement. Where shelters do exist, they often fall prey to vandalism or are used for other purposes. One Sand Springs resident told the Tulsa World that as Wednesday’s tornado bore down, she discovered that her RV park’s designated shelter was “full of washing machines”.


Figure 2. The paths of the Moore, Oklahoma tornadoes from May 3, 1999 (green); May 8, 2003 (blue); and May 20, 2013 (red), together with the preliminary path of the March 25, 2015 tornado (yellow). This year’s tornado crossed the path of the 1999 tornado near the northwest edge of Moore and intersected the 2013 path near Interstate 35. Image credit: NWS/Norman and NWS.

Few if any cities have experienced the kind of protracted bad luck with tornadoes that Moore has had to deal with (see Figure 2). The city endured major twisters on May 3, 1999 (killing 36 and injuring 583 along its full path); May 8, 2003; and May 20, 2013 (killing 24 and injuring 377 along its full path). Wednesday’s tornado was far less destructive, mostly knocking out windows and destroying carports and trees, although it blew over some vehicles and knocked out the three transmission towers of the radio station KOKC (formerly KOMA, which broadcast from a separate tower in the mid-1950s that was the world’s largest structure at the time).

TWC's Jon Erdman has a nice article on the Moore and Oklahoma City Tornado History.

Bob Henson
Tornado Warned Supercell (mrwing13)
Tornado Warned Supercell
Spring Sky (mrwing13)
A gorgeous display of mammatus clouds, just before a tornado warning was issued for our area.
Spring Sky
Storms rolling in (2dogs)
Storms headed our way
Storms rolling in

Weather Underground National Forecast for Thursday,March 26,2015

By: nationalsummary , 10:00PM,GMT on March 25,2015




Weather Underground Forecast for Thursday,March 26,2015

Showers and thunderstorms will move across the Eastern states on Thursday as a strong low pressure system and associated cold front advance eastward over the Mississippi River Valley. The system will continue pulling abundant moisture and energy northward from the Gulf of Mexico, allowing for moderate to heavy rainfall to develop from the Northeast through the Gulf Coast. This system has a history of producing severe thunderstorms with large hail and damaging winds. However, on Thursday, this system will lose some energy and thus the Eastern states are under a low risk of severe thunderstorm development. The main threats of strong and damaging winds accompanying these thunderstorms are most likely to develop from eastern North Carolina northward into southern Maryland in the late morning and

early afternoon hours. Rainfall totals will vary from 0.5 to 1.0 inches in most areas, with isolated areas seeing over 1 inch in areas of strong thunderstorm development.

Behind this system, cold air will filter in from Canada, bringing cooler temperatures to the center of the nation on Thursday. Expect highs to range from 10 to 20 degrees below seasonable for the Plains and the Eastern Valleys on Thursday.

Out West, another trough of low pressure dips into the Pacific Northwest, pushing more moisture onshore from the Pacific Ocean. This will maintain widespread scattered rain showers across parts of Washington and far northern Oregon. Significant precipitation is not anticipated.

This Date in Weather History for March 26,2015 from weatherforyou.com

Weather History
For Thursday,March 26,2015
 
 
 
 
1913 - The Ohio River Basin flood reached a peak. Ten inch rains over a wide area of the Ohio River Basin inundated cities in Ohio, drowning 467 persons, and causing 147 million dollars damage. The Miami River at Dayton reached a level eight feet higher than ever before. The flood, caused by warm weather and heavy rains, was the second mostly deadly of record for the nation. (David Ludlum)
1954 - The temperature at Allaket, AK, plunged to 69 degrees below zero. (The Weather Channel)
1971 - Parts of northern and central Georgia experienced their worst snow and ice storm since 1935. Two day power outages ruined two million eggs at poultry hatches. Two persons were killed when a tree landed on their car. (25th-26th) (The Weather Channel)
1987 - A cold front crossing the Plateau Region produced high winds in Utah causing some property damage. Winds gusted to 51 mph at Salt Lake City. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)
1988 - Twenty cities in the southwestern U.S. reported new record high temperatures for the date. Afternoon highs of 73 degrees at Flagstaff AZ, 90 degrees at Sacramento CA, 95 degrees at Santa Maria CA, 95 degrees at Los Angeles CA, 99 degrees at Tucson AZ, and 100 degrees at Phoenix AZ set records for March. (The National Weather Summary)
1989 - The Easter Bunny brought record warm temperatures to the central U.S. while such records were still welcome. A dozen cities reported record warm readings, including Dodge City KS with an afternoon high of 88 degrees. Strong southerly winds gusted to 51 mph at Dodge City, and reached 55 mph at Salina KS. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)
1990 - Fair weather prevailed across the nation for the second day in a row. Freezing temperatures were reported in the Middle Atlantic Coast Region in the wake of an early spring snowstorm. Afternoon highs were again in the 70s and 80s in the southeastern U.S., and for the ninth day in a row, temperatures in the southwestern U.S. reached the 90s. (The National Weather Summary)

Los Angeles: Heat to Surge Again Following Brief Cool Down

By Michael Kuhne, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
March 26,2015; 11:40PM,EDT
 
Following another day of near-record warmth across Southern California, a slight cool down will occur over the weekend before temperatures begin to climb once again.
Residents of Los Angeles can expect sunshine on Friday with high temperatures reaching the lower 90s once again.
The record high is 91 set back in 1986 and we are expecting that to be broken.
"The large area of high pressure over top of the region will break down over the weekend, allowing for some slightly cooler, though still above-normal temperatures," AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Brian Edwards said.
High temperatures on Saturday will reach the lower 80s underneath sunny skies.

"A few clouds will stream over the area Saturday night into Sunday as a weak upper-level disturbance passes by," he said.
Highs on Sunday will reach the upper 70s with a mixture of clouds and sunshine.
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By the new week, temperatures will begin to climb again.
"Temperatures will climb back up into the 80s for Monday and Tuesday with a good deal of sunshine expected both days," Edwards said.
 

San Francisco: Warmth to Hold into New Week

By Michael Kuhne, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
March 26,2015; 11:35PM,EDT
 
Warm weather and sunshine will continue to hold into the new week across the Bay area.
"The weekend looks pretty nice," AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Danielle Knittle said.
Temperatures will hover around 70 F, with sunshine and a few clouds during the day, she added.

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"Early in the week, high pressure stays in control though Monday, but we'll see it weaken slightly heading into Tuesday and Wednesday.
Clouds will build in the area, but no rain is expected, she said.
Temps Monday and Tuesday will remain around 70 F, but may sink by a few degrees at midweek.
 

Northeast to Turn Sharply Colder, Snowy This Weekend

By , AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist
March 26,2015; 11:32PM,EDT
 
Following the surge in warmth in coastal areas and the central Appalachians on Thursday, temperatures will again bottom out at cold levels in the Northeast this weekend.
After receiving a taste of spring weather in many areas, the weather will slide back into winter mode for a time this weekend.
Friday will be the transition day to the change to colder weather.

While far from the monthly minimum set during the first week of the month, temperatures will drop to 10-20 degrees below average for late March this weekend.
Temperatures are forecast to drop into the teens on Saturday night in much of the Appalachians and in upstate New York.
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On the Atlantic coast, temperatures will plunge 40-50 degrees Fahrenheit from their highs on Thursday to forecast lows on Sunday. Lows along the Interstate-95 corridor will be in the 20s.
A frost or freeze will even plunge into interior areas of the South this weekend.
Snow will also accompany the cold air in some locations.

The combination of lingering moisture and a weak disturbance moving through will produce flurries and locally heavier snow showers over the central Appalachians to part of the mid-Atlantic and southern New England coast during the first part of the weekend. Enough snow could fall to coat the ground in some of the heavier snow showers.
While most major highways and roads in urban areas will be wet where it does manage to snow, there can be some slushy and slippery spots, especially where the snow falls at night or first thing in the morning.
Temperatures will recover somewhat on Sunday. However, in most areas, temperatures will remain below the late-month average. Highs on Sunday will range from the upper 30s in the northern tier to the 40s in much of New England and the central Appalachians to the lower 50s in the Chesapeake Bay region.
During the tail end of the weekend, another weak disturbance will push eastward from the Midwest. Snow showers could be significant enough to coat the ground from the central Appalachians to the lower Great Lakes on Sunday night.