Friday, May 27, 2016

World Weather Hot Spot for May 27-28,2016 from accuweather.com

Kansas City,Missouri,USA: Severe weather;received golf-ball-sized hail and a whopping 4.25 inches of rain on Thursday (May 26,2016)

WeatherWhys for May 27,2016 from accuweather.com

The third deadliest tornado in United States' history struck St. Louis, Missouri, and the East St. Louis, Illinois, area on this date back in 1896. This F4-rated twister left 255 dead and over 1,000 injured as it devastated the region.

8 Things to Know About the 2016 Atlantic Hurricane Season

Jon Erdman
Published: May 26,2016

The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season is upon us.
One prominent suppressor of tropical activity is absent. Does that mean the recent stretch of relatively few U.S. hurricane landfalls will continue?
Let's step through some of the interesting changes and other items to watch this season.
(MORE: Hurricane Central)

1.) El Niño is Gone

As the 2015 hurricane season kicked off, a moderate El Niño was already in place, intensifying to the strongest El Niño since 1997 by late in the season.
Starting in late winter 2016, this previously record-tying El Niño fizzled rapidly.
Strong El Niños are known to produce strong wind shear – a large change in wind speed and/or direction with height that acts to either keep tropical cyclones from forming or rip apart any existing storms.
Last season, the only two named storms that tried to approach the Caribbean – Danny and Erika – both fizzled, thanks to the strongest wind shear on record since 1979 for that area, according to Colorado State University tropical meteorologist Dr. Phil Klotzbach.
(MORE: 2015 Hurricane Season Recap)

2.) More Named Storms Expected

Lacking the strong El Niño, it loads the dice toward an increased chance of tropical cyclones surviving into the Caribbean Sea, or forming there in 2016, particularly later in the season as El Niño disappears farther in the rear-view mirror.
This is just one factor weighing into a small uptick in the total number of named storms forecast by The Weather Company and Colorado State University.
(MORE: 2016 Hurricane Season Outlook)
As we've noted numerous times, tropical cyclone-suppressing wind shear and dry air can be, and have been, in place in the absence of El Niño in recent years.
Suffice it to say, the forecast is more uncertain this season.

3.) Landfall(s)? That's a Good Question ...

Named StormsHurricanesCat. 3+ HurricanesU.S. Hurricane Landfalls
1998141033
19834311
19738410
196611732
195810750
The table above shows Atlantic season statistics in five previous hurricane seasons following strong El Niños, using the El Niño intensity classification scheme from consultant meteorologist Jan Null.
As you can see, there's quite a spread, ranging from a record low four named storms in 1983 to 14 such storms in 1998.
The 1998 season featured seven U.S. landfalling tropical cyclones, three of which – Bonnie, Earl, and Georges – were hurricanes at landfall.
Despite only four named storms in 1983, two of those made U.S. landfall, including Cat. 3 Hurricane Alicia in southeast Texas.
This again illustrates the poor correlation between the number of named storms or hurricanes and landfalls.
And, regarding some seasonal landfall forecasts out there, we'll just let current National Hurricane Center Director Dr. Rick Knabb lay it out.


4.) Hurricane Apathy?

U.S. hurricane landfalls the last 10 years. Note: Sandy in 2012 is not shown since it officially made landfall as a non-tropical cyclone.
This is a concern every season, but the recent dearth of U.S. hurricane landfalls is in record territory.
First, it's been nearly two years since the last U.S. hurricane landfall, when Arthur grazed eastern North Carolina over the Fourth of July holiday in 2014.
Arthur has been the only U.S. hurricane landfall since Superstorm Sandy.
From 2006 to 2015, only 13 percent of Atlantic hurricanes have impacted the mainland U.S., according to Klotzbach – a record low for any 10-year period during the satellite era (since the mid-1960s).
Florida's decade-plus-long hurricane drought has been well-covered. Klotzbach also noted Texas has also gone over seven years since its last hurricane landfall (Ike).
Such long gaps in hurricane activity like the one we are seeing can lead to complacency among residents, and millions of new residents near the coast have likely never experienced a hurricane.

5.) Less Active Seasons Ahead?

Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation from 1880 through February 2013.



























The North Atlantic Ocean undergoes sea-surface temperature changes lasting 20 to 40 years that have an influence on hurricane season activity, among other things.
The so-called Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation shifted into a warmer phase beginning in 1995, which has been found to correlate to a higher number of tropical storms becoming strong hurricanes, but not necessarily to the number of tropical storms or low-end hurricanes.
Recently, however, Klotzbach, among others, have noted the AMO has trended toward the cooler phase since late 2014.
Given this is a "multidecadal" signal, it may still not be obvious yet that we have indeed shifted to a cool AMO phase this season, and we don't yet have the ability to predict when this will occur.
It'll be another variable to monitor that may have implications for the next several hurricane seasons.

6.) NHC Storm Surge Threat Map Live

Example of a storm surge forecast map from the National Hurricane Center.
(NHC Storm Surge Unit)
In most hurricanes, it's water – not wind – that claims lives.
Potentially the most prolific killer in a stronger hurricane is storm surge, a term used to describe the rise in water level above normal tide in coastal areas as the hurricane's wind pushes water ashore.
To more clearly communicate the danger, the National Hurricane Center has rolled out storm surge forecast maps which, instead of past forecasts relative to high or low tide, simply tell you how much water you can expect above ground level using a simple color code.
While the forecast doesn't include waves riding atop the surge, or any additional water rise from heavy rainfall or rivers draining toward coastal areas, it is meant to give you an idea of the threat in the simplest terms possible.
For more on this new product, check out the National Hurricane Center's writeup.

7.) Greater Inland Flood Threat For Some?

Ninety-day rainfall departures from average, in inches, over the South ending May 25, 2016, illustrating the wet southern Plains and Lower Mississippi Valley, but dry Southeast.





















One of the underrated dangers of tropical cyclones, no matter the intensity, is rainfall flooding. This, of course, can occur hundreds of miles inland from the coast.
Heading into the 2016 hurricane season, parts of Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas and west Tennessee have been soaked by one of their top 10 wettest springs on record. This included a deluge of over two feet of rain in March for parts of Louisiana, and what was described as the worst flooding since Allison in 2001 in the Houston metro area one month later.
Clearly, a landfalling tropical cyclone, particularly a slow-mover early in the season, could be disastrous for this area.

8.) New 'I' and 'T' Names

2016 Atlantic hurricane season names, with the new names replacing ones retired from 2010 denoted by red boxes. Alex is italicized since it was a hurricane in January, prior to the start of the season.
Atlantic and eastern Pacific tropical cyclone name lists typically repeat every six years, unless one is so destructive and/or deadly that a committee from the World Meteorological Organization, which selects the names, votes to retire that name from future lists.
(MORE: 2015's Retired Names | The Complete Retired Names List Since 1954)
In 2010, Hurricanes Igor and Tomas were retired, and are replaced in 2016 by "Ian" and "Tobias."
Igor was the most destructive hurricane in 75 years to hit Newfoundland in September 2010. Tomas was the latest-in-season hurricane on record to strike the Windward Islands, hammering St. Lucia with high winds, flooding and mudslides, while triggering additional flooding and mudslides in Haiti.
If you live where hurricanes and tropical storms threaten, you should be prepared every hurricane season, regardless of how long it's been since the last one, or what hurricane season outlooks say.
After all, it only takes one storm to turn any hurricane season into a disaster.
(MORE: Are You #HurricaneStrong?)
Jonathan Erdman is a senior meteorologist at weather.com and has been an incurable weather geek since a tornado narrowly missed his childhood home in Wisconsin at age 7.

Tropical or Subtropical Development off Southeast Coast Becoming More Likely

May 27,2016
An area of low pressure northeast of the Bahamas may become a tropical or subtropical depression or storm Friday into the weekend, and may soak parts of the Southeast coast during the Memorial Day weekend.
On Friday morning, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said that this system now has a 90 percent chance of developing into a subtropical or tropical depression or storm in the next two days. The Air Force Reserve is scheduled to send a plane on Friday afternoon to gather information on the developing low pressure system.
The area of interest has also been designated as Invest 91-L by the NHC. This naming convention is used by the NHC to identify features they are monitoring for potential future development into a depression or storm.
(MORE: What is an Invest?)
Here's what we know right now.
(MORE: Atlantic Hurricane Season Forecast)

Tropical or Subtropical Development Factors

A surface low pressure system has developed northeast of the Bahamas and is moving towards the northwest. This low pressure system is one of the ingredients required for a tropical or subtropical depression or storm to form. The other ingredient is persistent shower and thunderstorm activity collocated with the low.

Current Satellite View
Thunderstorm activity should organize around that central of circulation throughout the next day or so. This will be partially due to weakening upper-level winds as the system moves in the general direction of the Southeast coast. Slightly cooler water temperatures may limit intensification on Saturday.

Computer Model Track Forecast
While most computer model forecast guidance depicts that a low pressure system will move toward the Georgia or South Carolina coastline, there remains questions about how well organized it will be. The low will be passing over the warmer waters of the Gulf Stream, and environmental conditions are generally favorable for development.

What is the Upshot of All of This?


Saturday Forecast
No matter whether a tropical or subtropical depression or storm develops or not, there will likely be some impacts along the Southeast coast.
Those impacts will mostly be increased rainfall and the potential for rip currents and high surf for parts of the Southeast coast during the Memorial Day weekend.
(MORE: Holiday Weekend Outlook)
If you have plans to hit the beach along the Southeast coast this holiday weekend, we don't suggest canceling plans yet. Check back with us at weather.com. We will continue to watch this situation closely, and will provide updates over the next few days.

Sunday Forecast
(FORECAST: Virginia Beach | Hatteras | Myrtle Beach | Daytona Beach)
The next named storm of the 2016 Atlantic Hurricane Season will be given the name Bonnie.
If you recall, we already had the “A” named storm this season. Hurricane Alex was a rare January storm that formed in the eastern Atlantic Ocean and impacted the Azores.
(MORE: Florida's Lucky Hurricane Drought)

Southeast Coast is Typically an Early Season Area to Watch

This map shows the typical formation areas and tracks for named storms in June.
The area off the Southeast coast, as well as the Gulf of Mexico and northwest Caribbean, is a part of the Atlantic basin where early-season tropical or subtropical storm development is most likely.
That said, it's not a very active time of year for storms to form compared to the peak August-October period. For example, only one named storm forms during June every other year, on average.
(MORE: Where June Storms Develop)
Recent seasons have had activity before the start of June.
Last May, Tropical Storm Ana formed off the Southeast coast before making landfall near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, with minor impacts.
In 2012 two named storms, Alberto and Beryl, formed during May off the Southeast coast. Beryl would go on to make landfall in northeast Florida, while Alberto moved out to sea.
(MORE: When Hurricane Season Starts Early)

Difference Between Subtropical and Tropical Storms

A subtropical depression or storm exhibits features of both tropical and non-tropical systems, with a broad wind field, no cold or warm fronts, and generally low-topped thunderstorms spaced some distance from the center.
Subtropical cyclones typically are associated with upper-level lows and have colder temperatures aloft, whereas tropical cyclones are fully warm-core, and upper-level high-pressure systems overhead help facilitate their intensification.
Because of this hybrid nature, the National Hurricane Center still issues advisories and forecasts (i.e. projected path) for subtropical depressions and storms and assigns a number or name much like a regular tropical depression or tropical storm.
Occasionally, if thunderstorms cluster close enough and persist near the center, latent heat given off aloft from the thunderstorms can warm the air enough to make the storm a fully tropical storm.
When that happens, the wind field will tighten closer to the center. Of course, this would also open the door to further intensification.

MORE: Hurricanes From Space - Satellite Imagery

Flash Flooding Swamps Texas; Water Rescues Prompted From Up to 17 Inches of Rain; More Severe Storms Ahead

May 27,2016
Flash flooding from what in some areas has been a record calendar-day rain event swamped parts of Texas Thursday into Friday, as the threat of more severe thunderstorms looms again Friday.
Emergency crews in Bastrop County, Texas, were "overwhelmed with water rescues and other emergency calls" overnight Thursday night, according to a National Weather Service civil emergency message.

Storm Total Rainfall and Flood Reports
At least one home was flooded in nearby Caldwell County, Texas, necessitating a rescue. High water rescues were also ongoing early Friday near Buda, Texas.
Some of the worst flooding was between College Station and Houston.
Brenham, Texas, picked up a whopping 16.62 inches of rain Thursday alone, smashing the previous single wettest calendar-day record of 10.38 inches set on October 17, 1994. Incredibly, Thursday alone also topped the previous record for the entire month of May (15.09 inches set just last year) and would also be the fourth wettest month, there. Records date to 1897.
Also, Austin-Bergstrom Airport picked up 8.79 inches Thursday, the second wetttest calendar-day rain at that site dating to 1942. The wettest day at that particular site was just about seven months ago, when a deluge of 12.49 inches on October 30 prompted the airport tower to close.
Flash flooding will continue to be a threat in parts of Texas and other parts of the Plains and Lower Mississipi Valley Friday. Flood watches continue in parts of Kansas, Missouri and Texas.

Current Radar with Watches and Warnings
Guide to Watches and Warnings
(MORE: View National Interactive Radar Map | Difference Between a Watch and a Warning)
Thursday and early Friday morning, there were over 260 reports of severe weather, including 17 reports of tornadoes. A tornado just after midday damaged multiple homes in Bryan, Texas.
A thunderstorm approaching Kansas City, Missouri, had a confirmed tornado associated with it. Multiple reports stated that the Kansas City International Airport had to be evacuated due to the incoming severe weather. Travelers were instructed to move into the garage.
Severe thunderstorms will fire up once again in the Plains states Friday with a threat of a few more tornadoes, very large hail, strong winds and flash flooding. This next round of storms will follow what has been several days of severe weather in the central states since this past weekend.
(MORE: Large Kansas Tornado Wednesday | Dodge City's "Near-Miss" | Twin Tornadoes: Not As Rare As You Think)
This extended siege of severe weather is being triggered by ripples of energy ejecting eastward from a southward dip in the jet stream across the West.
On Friday, a stronger upper-level trough will swing through the Plains states, intercepting a warm, muggy air mass. Thus, the threat continues for more severe thunderstorms, including tornadoes.
Below is our latest forecast thinking on the timing and magnitude of this severe weather and flood event into early Saturday.

Severe Weather Forecast

Friday
  • Severe thunderstorms may still be rather numerous from parts of southern South Dakota and southern Minnesota to central and east Texas.
  • Threats: Flash flooding, damaging wind gusts, large hail and a few tornadoes.
  • Cities: Dallas | AustinHouston

Friday's Thunderstorm Forecast

Additional Rainfall Forecast

Storm Reports Since Saturday

Wednesday: 
Wednesday evening, a long-lived supercell thunderstorms spawned multiple tornadoes in northern Kansas, with damage reported to at least 20 homes.
The tornado narrowly missed the town of Chapman, and passed north of the city of Abilene. Preliminary survey results show that the tornado produced at least EF3 damage.
Preliminary tornado reports associated with the northern Kansas supercell on May 25, 2016. These do not imply the actual number of tornadoes or the precise path of such tornadoes, which will be determined by NWS damage surveys.
(Data: NOAA/NWS/SPC)
For more on Wednesday's storm reports, click here to read our impacts article.
Tuesday: 
Supercell thunderstorms spawned a swarm of tornadoes over western Kansas and in parts of four other states Tuesday.
(MORE: Latest Damage Reports Recap)
Over two dozen reports of tornadoes were received by the National Weather Service (NWS) Tuesday.
Dodge City, Kansas, had a very close call from a slow-moving supercell that spawned tornadoes southwest, west, and north of the city. Storm surveys have begun, and preliminary evidence supports an EF3 rating for tornado damage south-southwest of Dodge City according to the NWS. At times, there were two tornadoes in progress at once from that cyclical supercell.
(MORE: Dodge City, Kansas, Missed Tornado Disaster By Just Three Miles)
Radar, visible satellite, and tornado reports loop over western Kansas showing the tornadic supercells on May 24, 2016, from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. CDT.
































There were reports of a house being damaged east of Ensign, Kansas. Fortunately, the occupants of the home were said to be fine. After the tornado had passed, damage was reported on the west side of Dodge City, as well as a propane leak on the highway which blocked traffic.
Earlier Tuesday afternoon, there was a hailstorm in and around Denver, where the National Weather Service reported hailstones as large as golf balls. In fact, southeast of the city, hail was reported to be completely covering the ground – in some places so deep that it was considered "plowable."
There were even a pair of confimed tornadoes in Michigan's Upper Peninsula Tuesday, southwest of Marquette, Michigan. These were the first May tornadoes in Marquette County since at least 1973.
It wasn't just tornadoes Tuesday. Over six inches of rain triggered severe flash flooding in northeast Arkansas, including the city of Jonesboro.
For more on Tuesday's storm reports, click here to read our impacts article.
Monday:
On Monday evening, tornadoes were reported in Oklahoma and Texas. A tornado was spotted on the ground just north of Woodward, Oklahoma. No damage was reported in the area. Another tornado was later reported near Northfield, Texas.
There were a few baseball-size hail reports near Sanderson, Texas, Monday evening. In Silverton, Texas, there was a minor accumulation of 0.75-inch to 1-inch hailstones. Hail the size of golf balls fell west of McLean, Texas.
Additionally on Monday evening, quarter-size hail covered a portion of I-40 near Lake McClellan, Texas, and 60 mph wind gusts from the same severe thunderstorm overturned a semi-truck along I-40 in the same area. Injures were reported with the overturned semi-truck.
Sunday:
There were multiple reports of tornadoes Sunday evening across Texas, Kansas and South Dakota.
A tornado touched down near Howardwick, Texas, and another tornado was spotted south of Interstate 20 near Big Springs, Texas. A large tornado near Waka, Texas, knocked down a quarter-mile row of power lines. In Kansas, a half-mile wide wedge tornado was reported near Lydia. No major damage has been reported in all of the areas mentioned above.
Hail the size of tennis balls (2.50 inches) led to broken car windows near Post, Texas, Sunday evening, and hail as large as teacups (3 inches) was spotted near Elbow, Texas. Farther north in Nebraska, hail coated the ground near Mullen, where severe thunderstorms left residents without power.
Saturday:
Severe weather began late Saturday, but it was confined to parts of eastern Montana, western Kansas and western Texas. There was at least one tornado in Wichita County, Kansas, Saturday evening but no damage was reported.

Setup For Severe Weather

Severe weather is common in the spring when a southward dip in the jet stream (upper trough) pushes eastward from the Rockies to the Plains states.
That weather pattern is on display through Friday.
A trough of low pressure aloft across the western U.S. will continue to move very slowly eastward on Friday. As disturbances swing around the base of the trough and eject eastward from the Rocky Mountains to the Plains, a surge of deep moisture will ride northward from the warm Gulf of Mexico.
Meanwhile, winds aloft (low level jet) coming out of the south will be increasing in intensity. This combination is an ideal recipe for severe thunderstorms to develop.

Snapped An Awesome Shot? Share Your Photo!

If you crave pictures of severe weather, you've found your home here. Upload your photos or video (taking care to only take photos and videos from a safe location) to us and share your experience!
(PHOTO/VIDEO GALLERIES: Severe | Storms)
MORE: Plains Severe Weather - May 9, 2016 (Photo Gallery)

Flash Flooding Swamps Texas; Water Rescues Prompted From Up to 17 Inches of Rain; More Severe Storms Ahead

May 27,2016
Flash flooding from what in some areas has been a record calendar-day rain event swamped parts of Texas Thursday into Friday, as the threat of more severe thunderstorms looms again Friday.
Emergency crews in Bastrop County, Texas, were "overwhelmed with water rescues and other emergency calls" overnight Thursday night, according to a National Weather Service civil emergency message.

Storm Total Rainfall and Flood Reports
At least one home was flooded in nearby Caldwell County, Texas, necessitating a rescue. High water rescues were also ongoing early Friday near Buda, Texas.
Some of the worst flooding was between College Station and Houston.
Brenham, Texas, picked up a whopping 16.62 inches of rain Thursday alone, smashing the previous single wettest calendar-day record of 10.38 inches set on October 17, 1994. Incredibly, Thursday alone also topped the previous record for the entire month of May (15.09 inches set just last year) and would also be the fourth wettest month, there. Records date to 1897.
Also, Austin-Bergstrom Airport picked up 8.79 inches Thursday, the second wetttest calendar-day rain at that site dating to 1942. The wettest day at that particular site was just about seven months ago, when a deluge of 12.49 inches on October 30 prompted the airport tower to close.
Flash flooding will continue to be a threat in parts of Texas and other parts of the Plains and Lower Mississipi Valley Friday. Flood watches continue in parts of Kansas, Missouri and Texas.

Current Radar with Watches and Warnings
Guide to Watches and Warnings
(MORE: View National Interactive Radar Map | Difference Between a Watch and a Warning)
Thursday and early Friday morning, there were over 260 reports of severe weather, including 17 reports of tornadoes. A tornado just after midday damaged multiple homes in Bryan, Texas.
A thunderstorm approaching Kansas City, Missouri, had a confirmed tornado associated with it. Multiple reports stated that the Kansas City International Airport had to be evacuated due to the incoming severe weather. Travelers were instructed to move into the garage.
Severe thunderstorms will fire up once again in the Plains states Friday with a threat of a few more tornadoes, very large hail, strong winds and flash flooding. This next round of storms will follow what has been several days of severe weather in the central states since this past weekend.
(MORE: Large Kansas Tornado Wednesday | Dodge City's "Near-Miss" | Twin Tornadoes: Not As Rare As You Think)
This extended siege of severe weather is being triggered by ripples of energy ejecting eastward from a southward dip in the jet stream across the West.
On Friday, a stronger upper-level trough will swing through the Plains states, intercepting a warm, muggy air mass. Thus, the threat continues for more severe thunderstorms, including tornadoes.
Below is our latest forecast thinking on the timing and magnitude of this severe weather and flood event into early Saturday.

Severe Weather Forecast

Friday
  • Severe thunderstorms may still be rather numerous from parts of southern South Dakota and southern Minnesota to central and east Texas.
  • Threats: Flash flooding, damaging wind gusts, large hail and a few tornadoes.
  • Cities: Dallas | AustinHouston

Friday's Thunderstorm Forecast

Additional Rainfall Forecast

Storm Reports Since Saturday

Wednesday: 
Wednesday evening, a long-lived supercell thunderstorms spawned multiple tornadoes in northern Kansas, with damage reported to at least 20 homes.
The tornado narrowly missed the town of Chapman, and passed north of the city of Abilene. Preliminary survey results show that the tornado produced at least EF3 damage.
Preliminary tornado reports associated with the northern Kansas supercell on May 25, 2016. These do not imply the actual number of tornadoes or the precise path of such tornadoes, which will be determined by NWS damage surveys.
(Data: NOAA/NWS/SPC)
For more on Wednesday's storm reports, click here to read our impacts article.
Tuesday: 
Supercell thunderstorms spawned a swarm of tornadoes over western Kansas and in parts of four other states Tuesday.
(MORE: Latest Damage Reports Recap)
Over two dozen reports of tornadoes were received by the National Weather Service (NWS) Tuesday.
Dodge City, Kansas, had a very close call from a slow-moving supercell that spawned tornadoes southwest, west, and north of the city. Storm surveys have begun, and preliminary evidence supports an EF3 rating for tornado damage south-southwest of Dodge City according to the NWS. At times, there were two tornadoes in progress at once from that cyclical supercell.
(MORE: Dodge City, Kansas, Missed Tornado Disaster By Just Three Miles)
Radar, visible satellite, and tornado reports loop over western Kansas showing the tornadic supercells on May 24, 2016, from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. CDT.

































There were reports of a house being damaged east of Ensign, Kansas. Fortunately, the occupants of the home were said to be fine. After the tornado had passed, damage was reported on the west side of Dodge City, as well as a propane leak on the highway which blocked traffic.
Earlier Tuesday afternoon, there was a hailstorm in and around Denver, where the National Weather Service reported hailstones as large as golf balls. In fact, southeast of the city, hail was reported to be completely covering the ground – in some places so deep that it was considered "plowable."
There were even a pair of confimed tornadoes in Michigan's Upper Peninsula Tuesday, southwest of Marquette, Michigan. These were the first May tornadoes in Marquette County since at least 1973.
It wasn't just tornadoes Tuesday. Over six inches of rain triggered severe flash flooding in northeast Arkansas, including the city of Jonesboro.
For more on Tuesday's storm reports, click here to read our impacts article.
Monday:
On Monday evening, tornadoes were reported in Oklahoma and Texas. A tornado was spotted on the ground just north of Woodward, Oklahoma. No damage was reported in the area. Another tornado was later reported near Northfield, Texas.
There were a few baseball-size hail reports near Sanderson, Texas, Monday evening. In Silverton, Texas, there was a minor accumulation of 0.75-inch to 1-inch hailstones. Hail the size of golf balls fell west of McLean, Texas.
Additionally on Monday evening, quarter-size hail covered a portion of I-40 near Lake McClellan, Texas, and 60 mph wind gusts from the same severe thunderstorm overturned a semi-truck along I-40 in the same area. Injures were reported with the overturned semi-truck.
Sunday:
There were multiple reports of tornadoes Sunday evening across Texas, Kansas and South Dakota.
A tornado touched down near Howardwick, Texas, and another tornado was spotted south of Interstate 20 near Big Springs, Texas. A large tornado near Waka, Texas, knocked down a quarter-mile row of power lines. In Kansas, a half-mile wide wedge tornado was reported near Lydia. No major damage has been reported in all of the areas mentioned above.
Hail the size of tennis balls (2.50 inches) led to broken car windows near Post, Texas, Sunday evening, and hail as large as teacups (3 inches) was spotted near Elbow, Texas. Farther north in Nebraska, hail coated the ground near Mullen, where severe thunderstorms left residents without power.
Saturday:
Severe weather began late Saturday, but it was confined to parts of eastern Montana, western Kansas and western Texas. There was at least one tornado in Wichita County, Kansas, Saturday evening but no damage was reported.

Setup For Severe Weather

Severe weather is common in the spring when a southward dip in the jet stream (upper trough) pushes eastward from the Rockies to the Plains states.
That weather pattern is on display through Friday.
A trough of low pressure aloft across the western U.S. will continue to move very slowly eastward on Friday. As disturbances swing around the base of the trough and eject eastward from the Rocky Mountains to the Plains, a surge of deep moisture will ride northward from the warm Gulf of Mexico.
Meanwhile, winds aloft (low level jet) coming out of the south will be increasing in intensity. This combination is an ideal recipe for severe thunderstorms to develop.

Snapped An Awesome Shot? Share Your Photo!

If you crave pictures of severe weather, you've found your home here. Upload your photos or video (taking care to only take photos and videos from a safe location) to us and share your experience!
(PHOTO/VIDEO GALLERIES: Severe | Storms)
MORE: Plains Severe Weather - May 9, 2016 (Photo Gallery)

At Least 1 Dead, 5 Missing as Flooding Engulfs Parts of Texas; Helicopter Rescues 5 Near Austin

Eric Chaney
Published: May 27,2016

One person has died and five are missing in Texas after a severe storm system fired up once again in the Plains, bringing heavy rain and severe flooding to parts of the Plains.
The Brenham Fire Department told KHOU 11 News one person died in a trailer home in Chappell Hill, Texas. The home was flooded as storms stalled over the Brenham area Thursday night.
KHOU also reported two people missing from their flooded vehicles in the same area. Two others are missing in the Austin area.
High waters covered roadways and prompted evacuations across the region Thursday and into Friday. Tornadoes that caused damage were also reported in the Lone Star State and Kansas, where twisters have been spotted for a third consecutive day.
(FORECAST: Severe Weather Outbreak Possible, Including Tornadoes, Thursday in the Plains States)
Here are the latest impacts from these storms.

Texas

Emergency officials are searching for two people whose vehicles were found in floodwaters near Brenham, KHOU reported. According to the station, one of the missing is 21-year-old Darren Mitchell, family members tell KHOU 11. He called his mom to say he was in high water.
He also posted to Facebook when his car was in flood water, "And all I wanted to do was go home." Friday morning, officials found his truck overturned in water near 105.
Fire crews are searching for two people that were swept away by floodwaters early Friday morning in southeast Travis County, KVUE reported. ESD 11 Chief Ken Bailey confirms to the station the two were swept away around 1:15 a.m. Friday.
The exact details of the incident are still unclear, but reports to police said the two individuals' car had been swept off the road and the two people inside got stuck in a tree around 2:30 a.m, KXAN reported.
Travis County Fire Rescue spokesperson Ken Bailey told KEYE that the people were on top of the car and rescue crews were preparing to go to them when water swept them away.
Travis County Emergency Services spokeswoman Lisa Block said waters have receded in the area where the two people are missing and officials are hopeful they are safe.
Five people were rescued from the roof of a home by helicopter near Austin. Several Austin neighborhoods were evacuated early Friday morning, KXAN reports, and drivers are being asked to stay off roads in Bastrop County due to the dangerous situation unfolding as waters continue to rise along the Colorado River and cover roadways.
"Rainfall is expected to be generally to the east of the Austin area through this evening, but should a thunderstorm pop up near or west of Austin heavy rainfall and higher totals up to 2" could occur, adding to area's flooding woes," said weather.com meteorologist Jonathan Belles.
Water rescues took place in Bryan Thursday after two vehicles became trapped by rising water in separate incidents, according to a local fire official. Texas Avenue was also inundated by flooding, obstructing officials from responding to the scene of the rescue. Both vehicle occupants were safely rescued.
Heavy rains in Brenham, Texas, washed out a road and overturned a vehicle.
(Anoushah Rasta/KPRC)






































Highway 71 was closed at the Travis/Bastrop County Line due to water over the roadway, KXAN reported. Washington County saw 36 high water rescues Thursday and State Highway 36 and U.S. 290 became flooded and impassable, NWS reports.
Nearly 50 miles east of Austin in Giddings, some residents in the Hickory Creek subdivision had to wade through water up to four feet deep to try to get out of their homes around dinner time on Thursday, KEYE reports.
Along Highway 290, there were several accidents from the storm. A semi-truck rolled over and in a separate accident a car hydroplaned and also rolled several times. No one was seriously injured.
In Brenham high water washed parts of at least one road, leaving huge gaps in some spots and tearing up the pavement in others, KPRC reports. The city saw 16.62 inches of rain on Thursday, sahttering the old one-day record by 6.24 inches.
Heavy storms in Montgomery County led to several reports of lightning strikes and water rescues Thursday, according to the Montgomery County Fire Marshal's Office.
The National Weather Service reported a tornado touched down near Wixon Valley and was moving northeast Thursday afternoon.
KAGS News tweeted several photos of apparent tornado damage to homes in Bryan but said there were no injuries reported as of early Thursday afternoon. According to KTBC reporter Chris Walker, Brazos County officials reported tornado damage in the Wheeler Ridge subdivision of College Station.
"When I turned the corner and saw the tornado, all I could see was just debris and trees flying. It was just a war zone," resident Don Maxwell told the Houston Chronicle.
Bryan residents told Fox 7 that after the storm passed, traffic lights were out, roads were blocked, many people couldn't get home and everything seemed very chaotic.
“I have never seen anything like this. Of my two years staying here, this has easily been one of the craziest days I have ever seen,” Kevin Ford, who lives in Bryan, told the station.
The Wallace Pack Unit prison in Navasota sustained damage to a pair of watchtowers and an outbuilding, the Associated Press reports. No one was injured and all staff members and 1,200 inmates were accounted for.
According to KBTX.com, lightning hit a home in Robertson County on Highway 79 Thursday morning and caused power outages in College Station, where more than 1,400 customers lost power.

Kansas

A tornado was reported in Wamego Thursday, and photos and videos of damage surfaced online.
Trees were uprooted and cars were destroyed by the downed timbers, reports KSNT News. A tree also collapsed on top of a home.
Falling hail about 2.75 inches broke the windows of vehicles and homes in Meriden Thursday, according to the National Weather Service. Power lines and several tree branches were also downed.

Missouri

Multiple reports stated that the Kansas City International Airport had to be evacuated Thursday due to the incoming weather. Travelers were instructed to move into the garage.
There were reports of 14,000 power outages across Kansas City Thursday, according to KMBC.
A tweet on the page of the Kansas City Royals announced that a game scheduled for Thursday evening was postponed due to the weather. A make-up date is to be determined.

Colorado

A reported tornado moved through Cheyenne County Thursday, scattering debris that caused westbound Highway 40 at Cheyenne Wells to be shut down.
Roadways in the area saw further trouble as two trucks were blown off the road 5 miles north of the line between Cheyenne and Kiowa counties, 11 News reports.
A storm near Colorado Springs pummeled the area with 1-inch diameter hail Thursday, according to AP. No injuries were reported.
People throughout the state took to social media to share posts of the torrent.
Lightning during a storm in Denver struck an airfield at the Denver International Airport, KDVR reports.
Plows had to be brought out at the airport to clear the runways, which became covered with hail Thursday during the storm.

The inclement weather led to 107 delays for flights at the Denver International Airport.
This is a developing story; please check back for frequent updates. 

1 Dead, 4 Missing as Flooding Engulfs Parts of Texas; Helicopter Rescues 5 Near Austin

Eric Chaney
Published: May 27,2016

One person has died and four are missing in Texas after a storm system fired up once again in the Plains, bringing heavy rain and severe flooding to parts of the Plains.
The Brenham Fire Department told KHOU 11 News one person died in a trailer home in Chappell Hill, Texas. The home was flooded as storms stalled over the Brenham area Thursday night.
KHOU also reported two people missing from their flooded vehicles in the same area. Two others are missing in the Austin area.
High waters covered roadways and prompted evacuations across the region Thursday and into Friday. Tornadoes that caused damage were also reported in the Lone Star State and Kansas, where twisters have been spotted for a third consecutive day.
(FORECAST: Severe Weather Outbreak Possible, Including Tornadoes, Thursday in the Plains States)
Here are the latest impacts from these storms.

Texas

Emergency officials are searching for two people whose vehicles were found in floodwaters near Brenham, KHOU reported. According to the station, one of the missing is 21-year-old Darren Mitchell, family members tell KHOU 11. He called his mom to say he was in high water.
He also posted to Facebook when his car was in flood water, "And all I wanted to do was go home." Friday morning, officials found his truck overturned in water near 105.
Fire crews are searching for two people that were swept away by floodwaters early Friday morning in southeast Travis County, KVUE reported. ESD 11 Chief Ken Bailey confirms to the station the two were swept away around 1:15 a.m. Friday.
The exact details of the incident are still unclear, but reports to police said the two individuals' car had been swept off the road and the two people inside got stuck in a tree around 2:30 a.m, KXAN reported.
Travis County Fire Rescue spokesperson Ken Bailey told KEYE that the people were on top of the car and rescue crews were preparing to go to them when water swept them away.
Travis County Emergency Services spokeswoman Lisa Block said waters have receded in the area where the two people are missing and officials are hopeful they are safe.
Five people were rescued from the roof of a home by helicopter near Austin. Several Austin neighborhoods were evacuated early Friday morning, KXAN reports, and drivers are being asked to stay off roads in Bastrop County due to the dangerous situation unfolding as waters continue to rise along the Colorado River and cover roadways.
"Rainfall is expected to be generally to the east of the Austin area through this evening, but should a thunderstorm pop up near or west of Austin heavy rainfall and higher totals up to 2" could occur, adding to area's flooding woes," said weather.com meteorologist Jonathan Belles.
Water rescues took place in Bryan Thursday after two vehicles became trapped by rising water in separate incidents, according to a local fire official. Texas Avenue was also inundated by flooding, obstructing officials from responding to the scene of the rescue. Both vehicle occupants were safely rescued.
Heavy rains in Brenham, Texas, washed out a road and overturned a vehicle.
(Anoushah Rasta/KPRC)



































Highway 71 was closed at the Travis/Bastrop County Line due to water over the roadway, KXAN reported. Washington County saw 36 high water rescues Thursday and State Highway 36 and U.S. 290 became flooded and impassable, NWS reports.
Nearly 50 miles east of Austin in Giddings, some residents in the Hickory Creek subdivision had to wade through water up to four feet deep to try to get out of their homes around dinner time on Thursday, KEYE reports.
Along Highway 290, there were several accidents from the storm. A semi-truck rolled over and in a separate accident a car hydroplaned and also rolled several times. No one was seriously injured.
In Brenham high water washed parts of at least one road, leaving huge gaps in some spots and tearing up the pavement in others, KPRC reports. The city saw 16.62 inches of rain on Thursday, shattering the old one-day record by 6.24 inches.
Heavy storms in Montgomery County led to several reports of lightning strikes and water rescues Thursday, according to the Montgomery County Fire Marshal's Office.
The National Weather Service reported a tornado touched down near Wixon Valley and was moving northeast Thursday afternoon.
KAGS News tweeted several photos of apparent tornado damage to homes in Bryan but said there were no injuries reported as of early Thursday afternoon. According to KTBC reporter Chris Walker, Brazos County officials reported tornado damage in the Wheeler Ridge subdivision of College Station.
"When I turned the corner and saw the tornado, all I could see was just debris and trees flying. It was just a war zone," resident Don Maxwell told the Houston Chronicle.
Bryan residents told Fox 7 that after the storm passed, traffic lights were out, roads were blocked, many people couldn't get home and everything seemed very chaotic.
“I have never seen anything like this. Of my two years staying here, this has easily been one of the craziest days I have ever seen,” Kevin Ford, who lives in Bryan, told the station.
The Wallace Pack Unit prison in Navasota sustained damage to a pair of watchtowers and an outbuilding, the Associated Press reports. No one was injured and all staff members and 1,200 inmates were accounted for.
According to KBTX.com, lightning hit a home in Robertson County on Highway 79 Thursday morning and caused power outages in College Station, where more than 1,400 customers lost power.

Kansas

A tornado was reported in Wamego Thursday, and photos and videos of damage surfaced online.
Trees were uprooted and cars were destroyed by the downed timbers, reports KSNT News. A tree also collapsed on top of a home.
Falling hail about 2.75 inches in diameter broke the windows of vehicles and homes in Meriden Thursday, according to the National Weather Service. Power lines and several tree branches were also downed.

Missouri

Multiple reports stated that the Kansas City International Airport had to be evacuated Thursday due to the incoming weather. Travelers were instructed to move into the garage.
There were reports of 14,000 power outages across Kansas City Thursday, according to KMBC.
A tweet on the page of the Kansas City Royals announced that a game scheduled for Thursday evening was postponed due to the weather. A make-up date is to be determined.

Colorado

A reported tornado moved through Cheyenne County Thursday, scattering debris that caused westbound Highway 40 at Cheyenne Wells to be shut down.
Roadways in the area saw further trouble as two trucks were blown off the road 5 miles north of the line between Cheyenne and Kiowa counties, 11 News reports.
A storm near Colorado Springs pummeled the area with 1-inch diameter hail Thursday, according to AP. No injuries were reported.
People throughout the state took to social media to share posts of the torrent.
Lightning during a storm in Denver struck an airfield at the Denver International Airport, a KDVR reporter said.
Plows had to be brought out at the airport to clear the runways, which became covered with hail Thursday during the storm.

The inclement weather led to 107 delays for flights at the Denver International Airport.
This is a developing story; please check back for frequent updates.

Weather Underground National Forecast for Friday,May 27,2016

By: nationalsummary , 10:00PM,GMT on May 26,2016





 
Weather Underground Forecast for Friday,May 27,2016

A trough of low pressure will move across the central third of the country on Friday, while a cold front shifts over the Northwest.

A deep trough of low pressure will push east northeastward across the southern Rockies and the Plains. Daytime heating will trigger showers and isolated thunderstorms over parts of the Sierra Nevada and the southern Rockies. Moisture from the Gulf of Mexico will move northward across the Plains and the Midwest. The aforementioned trough will interact with this moisture, which will lead to widespread rain and thunderstorms. Severe thunderstorms will be possible in eastern Texas, southern Oklahoma and southwest Arkansas. These thunderstorms will be capable of producing large hail, dangerous straight line winds and isolated tornadoes. In addition, heavy rain will bring threats of flash flooding to eastern Texas, eastern Oklahoma, northwest Louisiana, Arkansas, southern Missouri, northeast Iowa, southeast Minnesota and western Wisconsin. Thunderstorms are also forecast to expand eastward over the northern Mid-Atlantic and New England. Most of the Southeast will stay clear of precipitation, with the exception to thunderstorms over southern Florida.

Meanwhile, a cold front will stretch southwestward across the upper Intermountain West and the Great Basin. Scattered showers and high elevation snow will affect the Pacific Northwest and the northern Rockies. A cluster of thunderstorms will also form over the northern high Plains on Friday.

This Date in Weather History for May 27,2016 from weatherforyou.com

Weather History
For Friday,May 27,2016
 
 
 
 
1896 - A massive tornado struck Saint Louis, MO, killing 306 persons and causing thirteen million dollars damage. The tornado path was short, but cut across a densely populated area. It touched down six miles west of Eads Bridge in Saint Louis and widened to a mile as it crossed into East Saint Louis. The tornado was the most destructive of record in the U.S. up until that time. It pierced a five-eighths inch thick iron sheet with a two by four inch pine plank. A brilliant display of lightning accompanied the storm. (David Ludlum) (The Weather Channel)
1987 - Severe thunderstorms in West Texas produced baseball size hail at Crane, hail up to three and a half inches in diameter at Post, and grapefruit size hail south of Midland. Five days of flooding commenced in Oklahoma. Thunderstorms produced 7 to 9 inches of rain in central Oklahoma. Oklahoma City reported 4.33 inches of rain in six hours. Up to six inches of rain caused flooding in north central Texas. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)
1988 - Sunny and warm weather prevailed across much of the nation to kick off the Memorial Day weekend. Afternoon thunderstorms in southern Florida caused the mercury at Miami to dip to a record low reading of 69 degrees. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)
1989 - Unseasonably hot weather prevailed in the southeastern U.S. Ten cities reported record high temperatures for the date as readings soared into the 90s. Lakeland, FL, reported a record high of 99 degrees, and Biloxi, MS, reported a temperature of 90 degrees along with a relative humidity of 75 percent. (The National Weather Summary)
1990 - Thunderstorms produced severe weather from north central Texas to the Central Gulf Coast Region. Severe thunderstorms spawned four tornadoes, and there were eighty-one reports of large hail or damaging winds. Late afternoon thunderstorms over southeast Louisiana produced high winds which injured twenty-seven persons at an outdoor music concert in Baton Rouge, and high winds which gusted to 78 mph at the Lake Ponchartrain Causeway. (Storm Data) (The National Weather Summary)

Thursday, May 26, 2016

National Temperature and Rainfall Extremes for May 26,2016 from accuweather.com

As of 11PM,EDT/8PM,PDT



Daily U.S. Extremes

past 24 hours

Extreme Location
High 99° Pecos, TX
Low 21° Antero Reservoir, CO
Precip 16.62" Brenham, TX

Rain may dampen Monaco Grand Prix, historic 100th running of Indy 500 this weekend

By Brian Lada, Meteorologist
May 26,2016; 9:49PM,EDT
 
This weekend will be the biggest racing weekend of the year with three major races drawing in millions of viewers from around the globe.
The biggest race of the day will take place at the famous Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Sunday afternoon with the 100th running of the Indy 500.
A sold out crowd of 350,000 will be in attendance for the historic race as Indy car drivers from around the world compete for the $2.5 million payout, a swig of milk from victory lane and their name forever cemented in history.
Sunday's Indy 500 will be preceded by the formula One Monaco Grand Prix in Europe and followed up by NASCAR's Coca-Cola 600 in Charlotte, North Carolina.
Unfortunately for race fans, rainy weather could affect all three races over the Memorial Day weekend.
Monaco Grand Prix
The Formula One race in Monaco will be the first race of the day with drivers taking to the streets of the city for the 74th running of the Monaco Grand Prix.
"The Monaco race is one of the biggest races of the year, and most watched Formula One races of the year," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alan Reppert said.
Unfortunately for the fans attending the Monaco Grand Prix, heavy rain and thunderstorms may move over the city when the race is set to take place.
Mercedes driver Nico Rosberg of Germany passes the checkered flag to win the Formula One Grand Prix of Monaco at the Monaco racetrack, in Monaco, Sunday, May 24, 2015. (AP Photo/Gero Breloer)
While Formula One cars are usually capable of racing in light rain, heavier rain and thunderstorms may force the race to be delayed.
Even if the rain stays on the lighter side, it will cause the race to play out much differently than if the race was held under dry conditions.
"Any rain could make for a crash-filled race that has a whole lot of lead changes and major stories," Reppert said.
Fans attending the race should pay attention to the weather and move to a sheltered area if a thunderstorm moves in during the race.
The Monaco Grand Prix is set to start at 8 a.m. EDT (1 p.m. BST).
100th running of the Indy 500
The most anticipated race of the weekend will likely be the 100th running of the Indy 500, taking place at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Indiana.
Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to attend the historic race, but those attending may want to take a raincoat or poncho with them into the tack.
The forecast for Sunday calls for a shower or thunderstorm in the afternoon which could soak drivers, crews and fans out in the open.
Indy cars are usually able to race in light rain, but this is not the case for Indy car races in Indianapolis.
"Rain tires are made for Indy cars, but those are only for road courses, as the speeds at the Indy 500 are too high," Reppert said.
RELATED:
Detailed forecast for Monaco
Detailed forecast for Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Detailed forecast for Charlotte Motor Speedway

Even if dry weather manages to hold over the 100th, weather can still have an affect on the way that the cars handle.
According to Reppert, if it rains in the days leading up to the race, it can wash away the rubber that was put down on the track.
Rubber usually accumulates on the track leading up to the race during qualifying and practices. This rubber helps to give drivers grip as the speed around the track at speeds exceeding 200 mph.
Sunday's Indy 500 is set to start around 12:20 p.m. EDT.
Helio Castroneves, of Brazil, leads Carlos Munoz (26), of Colombia, Josef Newgarden (21), JR Hildebrand (6) and Scott Dixon, of New Zealand, down the main straightway during a practice session for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Monday, May 23, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
NASCAR's Coca-Cola 600
Sunday's final race will be the longest of the weekend as NASCAR drivers compete in a 600-mile race at Charlotte Motor Speedway.
Much of the weekend should be dry in Charlotte; however, there is a small chance that a shower could move through during the race.
Even if it does rain at the track, the rain should not last long and NASCAR should be able to use their Air Titans to dry the track quickly so the race can continue.
The green flag is scheduled to drop at 6:15 p.m. EDT.
In a photo made with a slow shutter speed cars race out of Turn 4 during the NASCAR Sprint Cup series auto race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, North Carolina, Sunday, May 24, 2015. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn)
 

Memorial Day weekend forecast: Tropical system may jeopardize beach plans along Southeast coast

By Renee Duff, AccuWeather.com Meteorologist
May 26,2016; 8:37PM,EDT
 
 
As millions prepare to take part in Memorial Day weekend events, showers, storms and a potential tropical system could threaten outdoor activities and travel plans during the extended weekend.
Whether you are hitting the roadway to reach a vacation destination, attending a local parade or firing up the grill, know exactly when rain or storms will impact your Memorial Day weekend plans with AccuWeather MinuteCast®.
JUMP TO: Tropical system may brew near Southeast coast| Northeast, Great Lakes: Storms to fire in warm and humid pattern | Storms to ignite over central US, interior West | Dry weather to highlight Memorial Day across the Upper Midwest, Southwest and West Coast

RELATED:
Check AccuWeather MinuteCast® for your exact location
US interactive weather radar
AccuWeather severe weather center

Tropical system may brew near Southeast coast
People along the southeastern United States will want to monitor the potential for a tropical system to develop near the coast around Memorial Day weekend.
AccuWeather's Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski is closely monitoring an area near the Bahamas for potential development.
Should a storm develop and move into the Southeast coast, one or more days of drenching rain and gusty winds could impact the region during the holiday weekend.
Those in the mid-Atlantic could also be in the path of drenching rainfall for part of Memorial Day weekend should a storm develop and move up the Eastern Seaboard.
Regardless of whether a fully fledged tropical system develops, areas of showers and thunderstorms are expected to increase throughout the weekend, threatening any outdoor plans.
Those planning to spend the holiday at the beach should remain alert for increasingly rough surf conditions and should heed all warnings.
Northeast, Great Lakes: Storms to fire in warm and humid pattern
Residents of the Northeast and Great Lakes may have to dodge showers and thunderstorms popping up throughout the holiday weekend. The most likely time for thunderstorms to ignite will be during the afternoon.
While each day is not expected to be a washout, area residents will need to be prepared to bring outdoor celebrations inside at the first rumble of thunder.
Warm and muggy conditions are expected to continue across the region, making it feel like summer has already begun.
Storms to ignite over central US, interior West
Thunderstorms will be a daily concern across the central United States and interior West this weekend.
"The central and southern Plains and interior West will stay active with rounds of storms continuing throughout Memorial Day weekend," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Matt Rinde stated.
As is typical in late spring, a few storms could become strong and produce gusty winds and hail.
Rinde added that flash flooding could be a concern, mainly across the Plains where storms have hit hard recently.
Dry weather to highlight Memorial Day across the Upper Midwest, Southwest and West Coast
Weather-related disruptions are not expected for holiday plans across the Upper Midwest, Southwest and West Coast.
While storms may impact the Midwest on Saturday and Sunday, dry weather should return in time for Memorial Day.

2016 Asia summer forecast: Drought to ease in India; La Nina to suppress typhoons in West Pacific

By , AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist
May 26,2016; 8:44PM,EDT
 
 
This summer, the pattern responsible for extensive drought and heat in southeastern Asia will break down enough to bring relief to some nations. Meanwhile, the tropics will spring to life for a time.
Rainfall from the southwest monsoon and the East Asia monsoon is forecast to be more robust this summer due to the weakening El Niño.

JUMP TO: La Niña to develop by late summer| Downpours to ramp up in southeastern Asia, recur in part of Middle East | Stubborn areas of drought may still persist | Below-normal normal number of typhoons, tropical storms anticipated
La Niña to develop by late summer
El Niño is defined by above-average sea-surface temperatures in the eastern and central equatorial Pacific Ocean. These sea-surface temperatures cycle from warm to cool, relative to average, over a several-year period. When the sea-surface temperatures in the same area of the Pacific Ocean are cooler than average for a few months, a La Niña pattern has developed.
"El Niño will transition to neutral conditions early this summer, then perhaps toward a weak La Nina during August or September," according to AccuWeather Chief International Meteorologist Jason Nicholls. "Because of this and other factors, we expect rainfall to return toward average over a large part of India, Malaysia and Indonesia."
RELATED:
India Weather Center
MinuteCast® for your location
Interactive Asia weather satellite

The speed at which the cycle trends toward La Niña will contribute to the amount of rainfall.
"If El Niño conditions linger through much of the summer, average or less-than-average rainfall could still occur," Nicholls said. "Conversely, if La Niña conditions develop more quickly, then rainfall could trend to well above average in some areas."
Rain to ramp up in southeastern Asia, recur in part of Middle East
While the East Asia monsoon contributes to a significant amount of rain annually in southeastern China, the region could be significantly wetter than average.
"Rainfall could be excessive in part of the Yangtze River Valley with the possibility of flooding in agricultural and heavily populated areas," Nicholls said.
Rain will significantly ease drought and heat in portions of India, Malaysia and Indonesia.
"Routine pulses of thunderstorms meandering around the Indian Ocean basin could also produce excessive rainfall and the risk of flooding in parts of India," according to AccuWeather Meteorologist Adam Douty.
In the Middle East, higher-than-average Indian Ocean temperatures, especially in the Arabian Sea, have contributed to localized heavy rainfall since last fall.
In this Nov. 24, 2015 image released by the Saudi Press Agency, cars drive on a flooded street in Al-Qassim Region, west of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (Saudi Press Agency via AP)
"We expect this part of the Indian Ocean to slowly cool, relative to normal," Nicholls said. "This might be enough to tone down the number of heavy rain events in the southeastern part of the Arabian Peninsula as the summer progresses."
Until the sea-surface temperature anomaly diminishes, the potential for scattered heavy rainfall will continue over the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula well into the summer.
Stubborn areas of drought may persist
There are likely to be some areas where the rain struggles, despite the diminishing El Niño. With some exceptions, El Niño greatly suppressed rainfall over a large part of southern Asia since last summer.
An area where rainfall could remain significantly below average during the summer includes the central part of the Philippines to Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and southeastern Myanmar.
Much of this area has been experiencing its worst drought in decades. The drought has taken its toll on the water supply, agriculture and economies in the region.
Especially hard hit has been the center of rice production in Asia: the Mekong River Delta.
In this March 28, 2016 photo, Thai workers repair a dried up irrigation canal at Chai Nat province, Thailand. Much of Southeast Asia is suffering its worst drought in 20 or more years. Tens of millions of people in the region are affected by the low level of the Mekong, a rice bowl-sustaining river system that flows into Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
As of early May in India, "the combination of excessive heat and drought has decimated crops, killed livestock and left at least 330 million without enough water for their daily needs," according to the Associated Press.
"Heat and drought go hand in hand," AccuWeather Meteorologist Jim Andrews said. "Both typically occur before before the summer rain arrives, but what has been going on during March and April has been exceptional."
Multiple nations in Southeast Asia experienced their hottest temperatures on record for any day of the year during April.
The list of nations that have experienced all-time record highs include Thailand at 44.6 C (112.3 F), Cambodia at 42.6 C (108.7 F), Laos at 42.3 C (108.1 F) and the Maldives at 34.9 C (94.8 F).
On May 19, 2016, India reached its highest temperature ever recorded when the mercury rose to 51 C (123.8 F) in Rajasthan.
Where the rain develops and becomes more frequent, heat will throttle back.
From much of the balance of Saudi Arabia to the Black and Caspian seas, a drier- and hotter-than-average summer is forecast.
Average to slightly above-average warmth with generally average rainfall is in store from Kazakhstan, northern China, Mongolia, central and Far East Russia and North and South Korea.
Below-normal normal number of typhoons, tropical storms anticipated
In terms of tropical activity, a lower number of tropical storms and typhoons are anticipated, relative to last year and the long-term average.

Last year there were 27 named tropical systems, of which 18 were typhoons and eight became super typhoons.
Despite the lower numbers forecast for the entire year, the summer part of the tropical season could be more active than the fall, in terms of impacts to land areas.
"Prior to the anticipated La Niña and less-favorable conditions for tropical systems this fall, low wind shear and warm waters, relative to average, will favor strengthening and a significant number of tropical systems in the western Pacific for a time this summer," according to AccuWeather Tropical Expert Dan Kottlowski.
The threat of direct impact from a tropical storm or typhoon will shift northward over the western Pacific shoreline as steering winds change the track of prospective systems throughout the summer.
"Areas that could be hit through the middle of the summer include the northern part of the Philippines, Taiwan and China," Nicholls said. "Toward the latter part of the summer and into the fall, the main risk area will shift toward Japan."
Should La Niña fail to develop during the late summer and fall, the number of tropical storms and typhoons could be close to average. Should La Niña develop at a fast pace, the number of tropical systems in the western Pacific could be well below average.
In the Indian Ocean basin, the summer tropical threat will be mainly during the early part of the season, as usual.
"There is a risk of one or more strikes by a tropical cyclone over Bangladesh, northeastern and southern India and northern Myanmar, as well as part of northwestern India and perhaps Oman," Nicholls said.
The threat in the Bay of Bengal is in addition to Cyclone Roanu.
People should not let their guard down, despite lower numbers of tropical storms and typhoons forecast. A single strike by a significant system can define a season through great destruction and loss of life.